Menstrual issues traced back to age 13

Many Fertility & Women’s Health Issues Could Be Traced Back To Mismanagement At Around Age 13

Early this week,  I was talking with a colleague about how I would love to be able to see all women before they head into IVF, or see them when they were a teenager to educate them and help the with a better future for their fertility and gynaecological health.

My colleague then said to me “The issue is that most women are mismanaged at around age 13 and this is why they end up having fertility issues and ongoing gynaecological and menstrual related issues later on.”

The truth is, if we really to trace back the cause, or start of a woman’s fertility, gynaecological, or menstrual related issues, it would most likely be due to mismanagement at around age 13 when she first got her period. In this video I bring light to this very introspective, and very interesting topic that many probably have not thought about. It isn’t always mismanaged by the people you think it is either.

Let’s bring better education and awareness to women’s health issues because we know that early intervention and early management if the key to better future outcomes. It all starts with education first. Have a listen to my video on this very important topic (click on the youtube video link to watch

If you, or your daughter needs help with a menstrual issue, or period pain etc, please give my friendly staff a call and ask how I may be able to assist you.

Regards

Andrew Orr

-No Stone Left Unturned

-Master of Women’s Health Medicine

-Master of Reproductive Medicine

-The Endometriosis Experts

-The Experts Program

EndometriosisAwarenessMonth 2020 1

Endometriosis Awareness Month – March 2020

This month is Endometriosis Awareness Month and it is so important to bring awareness to this disease that affects millions of women world wide.

1 in 10 women have endometriosis and those are the ones diagnosed. A significant portion of women with endometriosis are asymptomatic and many women do not realise they have it, or have been missed and dismissed along the way. This means the 1 in 10 women with endometriosis is grossly understated.

There is often up to 10 years or more to diagnosis, which means that many women are missed and dismissed before they are finally diagnosed. The only way to definitively diagnosed endometriosis is via surgical intervention (laparoscopy with histology). Scans and blood tests cannot definitely diagnose endometriosis.

The one message that all of us involved in the education and awareness of endometriosis want everyone to know is that “Period Pain” is not normal. While slight discomfort with a period may be normal, pain (especially bad period pain) is not normal. Period pain can be a sign of endometriosis.

While period pain is often the most talked about point of endometriosis, we also need to educate all that endometriosis just isn’t about period pain. There are so many other associated symptoms that we need to bring awareness to as well.

The common signs of endometriosis are:
Period Pain
Pain with intercourse
Ovulation pain
IBS like symptoms
Pain on bowel movement
Bleeding from the bowel
UTI like symptoms (without infection present)
Fatigue
Anxiety and mood disorders
Bloating (can be severe)- also known as endo belly
Musculosketal pain
Pelvic and rectal pressure feeling
Abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB)
Others

Endometriosis has hereditary links and it now thought to be genetic. Endometriosis is driven by estrogen, so even small amounts of exogenous estrogens will drive the disease. It is not from estrogen dominance and it is not autoimmune.

Endometriosis is basically normal tissue growing in abnormal areas. It behaves very much like cancer, but it is not cancerous. Endometriosis has been found in every part of the body and it can cause damage to multiple organs if it is not managed properly.

Many women with endometriosis are poorly managed, or are not being managed at all. This is why there needs to be more awareness about the serious complications of unmanaged endometriosis.

This month I will be focussing on the facts about Endometriosis and am also very excited be launching the first network of practitioners who are experts in Endometriosis called “The Endometriosis Experts”. There will also be a launch of other experts programs called “The PCOS Experts”, “The Women’s Health Experts” and “The International Fertility Experts”. Stay tuned for more exciting news to follow.

This month please also support Endometriosis Australia and the “Endo March” High Teas. I will be posting more information about these as well.

Lastly, if you have unmanaged endometriosis, or have bad period pain etc, please make sure you seek help for this. If you do need help, you can call my friendly staff and find out how I can assist you and more about my online, or in person consultations.

Please do not put up with period pain, or other menstrual related symptoms, or unmanaged endometriosis. Nobody can manage these symptoms themselves and why it is so important to see an Endometriosis expert.

Regards

Andrew Orr

-No Stone Left Unturned

-Master of Women’s Health Medicine

-The Endometriosis Experts

Endometriosis complications

The Complications That Can Result From Unmanaged Endometriosis

A lot of the information about endometriosis, is more about it’s symptoms, time to diagnosis and future fertility outcomes. While it is necessary to educate people about these things, nobody is really talking about the serious complications of unmanaged endometriosis. This is not to scare people, or create fear, but at the same time it does need to be talked about and for all concerned to know how serious this disease state can be at its worst.

We know that many women are missed and dismissed when it comes to endometriosis. It often takes up to 10 years, or even more for some women, before they are definitively diagnosed. Some women are never diagnosed and end up suffering a terrible life because of it. Some women with endometriosis are asymptomatic (meaning no symptoms) and often only get diagnosed as part of fertility evaluation, when they may be having trouble conceiving.

The symptoms of endometriosis are easy to see

The symptoms of endometriosis are very easy to see, if someone knows what they are looking for and knows the right questions to ask. Sure, a definite diagnosis via laparoscopy is still needed, but there are some very clear-cut pointers that a woman may have the disease. But due to lack of education and lack of true experts in this area means that lots of women are missed and dismissed, and that is a fact.

The vicious cycle of mismanagement

But while there are inadequacies in the healthcare profession when it comes to endometriosis, not all mismanagement can be blamed on healthcare professionals. There are people who are not seeking proper help soon enough, and some not at all, and this can lead to long-term complications too. We also have women trying to manage their own disease through advice of friends, social media groups and Dr Google as well. This then creates one hell of a mismanaged cycle that does not help anyone.

I can see the issues from all points of view, especially those who suffer the disease. But as a healthcare professional with a special interest in Endometriosis, I have had my fair share of non-compliant patients too.

While many have been let down through mismanagement, lack of funding and education, being missed and dismissed etc, there are many women who are self sabotaging as well. I have seen many not take on advice, recommendations and proper management of their disease, that could help them, then these same people scream high and low that the system has let them down. There are some who are just happy to live with the disease, as it is their only way of seeking attention. This is a fact also and we need to talk about it.

This is what has prompted me to do this post so that all concerned get to know what the serious side of mismanaged endometriosis is. Sometimes it is only via the serious harsh side of reality, that all concerned may actually get some help and some serious attention be bought to this disease state.

The common symptoms of endometriosis

We know that many women suffer greatly at the hands of this disease. Women with endometriosis can get the follow common symptoms:

  • Period pain
  • Pain with intercourse
  • IBS like symptoms
  • Gastrointestinal issues
  • Chronic constipation
  • Chronic diarrhoea
  • Pain on bowel movement
  • Bleeding from the bowel
  • Chronic abdominal pain
  • Severe bloating (endo belly)
  • Chronic bloating
  • Aversion to foods (even if they are not the trigger)
  • Ovulation Pain
  • Ovary pain
  • UTI like symptoms (with no infection present)
  • Migraines and headaches
  • Chronic pelvic pain
  • Pelvic and rectal pressure feeling
  • Musculoskeletal pain
  • Chronic nerve pain
  • Fluid retention
  • Iron deficiency
  • Mood swings
  • Anxiety
  • Depression
  • Mood disorders
  • Infertility
  • Other symptoms

Early intervention and management is crucial

Women’s lives are greatly impacted by this disease and it is important that not only healthcare professionals understand this but also sufferers of the disease. Early intervention and proper ongoing management is the key to helping this disease and everyone needs to be aware of this. Being missed and dismissed, or waiting too long to help, can really have some serious consequences if this disease is left to grow and spread and cause serious damage in the body

The serious consequences of mismanaged/unmanaged endometriosis

While we have talked about the common daily symptoms that many can put up with, we also need to bring attention to just how serious this disease can get. Let’s face it, it can and does spread like cancer and it can spread to every organ in the body. It has been found in the joints of bones, fingers, in the liver, around the lungs, around the diaphragm, around the heart, on the bowels, on the bladder, on the ovaries, on the pelvic, in the fallopian tubes, one the retina in the eyes and it has even found in the brain.

There is no doubt that this disease can be very devastating for anyone who has it, but what happens in the worst cause scenario, if it is left unmanaged.

The following can be serious complications of unmanaged endometriosis:

  • Haemorrhage from the ovaries
  • Ruptured ovaries
  • Ovarian torsion
  • Obliterated fallopian tubes
  • Ruptured endometrioma
  • Endometrioma infection
  • Pelvic infection
  • Obliteration of the pelvic cavity
  • Peritonitis
  • Sepsis
  • Compacted bowel
  • Obstructed bowel
  • Perforated bowel
  • Bowel haemorrhage
  • Torsion of the bowel and intestines.
  • Ureteral Obstruction (Blocked ureters)
  • Renal infection
  • Bladder obstruction
  • Painful bladder syndrome
  • Severe adhesions
  • Significant scar tissue build up
  • Significant fluid build up in the pelvic cavity.
  • Multiple organs adhered together
  • Diaphragmic adhesions
  • Liver damage
  • Perihepatic adhesions
  • Pericardial endometriosis
  • Cardiovascular events
  • Stroke
  • Chronic nerve pain
  • Pudendal nerve neuralgia.
  • Chronic musculosketal, or spinal pain
  • Arthritic like pain and associated symptoms
  • Chronic Migraine and neurological events.
  • Malignancies and cancers (rare but more research being done)
  • Hysterectomy
  • Recurrent miscarriage
  • Absolute infertility
  • Opioid dependency and addiction
  • Death from opioids medications
  • Complications from medications and hormonal treatments
  • Psychotic disorders
  • Mania
  • Incapacitation
  • Suicidal tendencies and thoughts
  • Suicide
  • Death (rare from endometriosis directly, but can be from associated factors related to endometriosis and also taking ones own life)
  • Other

Women with endometriosis need to see an “Endometriosis Expert”

This is why endometriosis needs to be managed properly and managed by a healthcare professional that specialises in the management of endometriosis and associated symptoms. You need to see and Endometriosis Expert.

People cannot treat, or manage the symptoms of endometriosis on their own. This is why it is so important to have the right care and also have a multimodality/team approach to endometriosis. No amount of google searching is going to help people treat endometriosis on their own. You need to find an endometriosis expert.

At the same time more education needs to be given to GP’s and other healthcare professionals about endometriosis. Too many women are being missed and dismissed because of lack of practitioner understanding and education at the front line. Women need to see healthcare professionals that specialise in endometriosis and endometriosis experts for this disease, not just a GP. Women also need access to advanced trained laparoscopic surgeons who specialise in excision surgery, not just a regular gynaecologist who is not advanced trained. I have talked about this often.

Endometriosis is not just about period pain

Lastly, we need to educate ‘all’ that endometriosis is not just about period pain. Endometriosis can present with many different signs and symptoms ranging from gastrointestinal symptoms, extreme bloating, bladder issues, bowel issues, IBS symptoms, migraines, fluid retentions, pain with intercourse, pain on bowel movement and so many other symptoms mentioned before. There is also the long-term impact on fertility for up to 50% of women too.

This is why early intervention and management of teenagers presenting with the disease symptoms is crucial. The longer the disease is left, the more damage it can do and all women deserve to be mothers (if they chose) and deserve a normal happy life. We also need to recognise the psychological impact of the disease and how this can present in someone with the disease as well.

Women are dying because of being mismanaged/unmanaged

Let’s face it, there are women dying because of this disease. Maybe not as direct result, but definitely indirectly. No woman should ever be pushed to the point where she cannot handle her pain and symptoms any longer and be only left with the choice of taking ones own life. This is exactly we need to bring more education to all about this disease. This means both healthcare practitioners and people with the disease itself too.

People need to be managed properly and by professionals. We need to start bring education and attention to this, so that people do not try to manage this disease on their own, and practitioners are held more accountable for dismissing women as well. Because if we don’t the complications of this can be very severe and sometime they can be fatal also.

Endometriosis awareness month is next month and I want to see all women with endometriosis being managed properly and seeking the right help. There are endometriosis experts out there who can help you if you have the disease and the associated symptoms. No woman should be doing this on their own.

Let me help you

If you so need help with managing endometriosis and the associated symptoms of endometriosis, please give my staff a call and find out how I can assist you. I have options for in-person consultations and online consultations. I use a multimodality/team approach and I also work in with some of the best medical healthcare professionals and surgeons in the country. I will always make sure you get the best care, best support and best management possible. I will also hold your hand every step of the way and make sure your every concern is listened to as well.

Regards

Andrew Orr

-No Stone Left Unturned

-Master of Women’s Health Medicine

-The Endometriosis Experts

 

 

 

 

 

When a Hysterectomy Should Be Considered

When A Hysterectomy Should Be Considered

Many times I have talked about “Why a hysterectomy does not cure endometriosis” and so I have decided to talk about “When a hysterectomy should be considered”

Now, before you go any further, I need people to sit back, listen objectively and also take the personal out of this. This is a very personal topic and yes, I am a man and a male healthcare practitioner all in one, with over 20 years experience in helping women with women’s health conditions and being a voice for them also. But regardless, this topic does need to be talked about. Any negative comments, or rudeness will get the delete button immediately. Constructive discussion is always welcome.

The long and short of it is this. There are times when a hysterectomy should be considered (lack of quality of life, cancers etc) and we need to be able to give women the facts so that they can make informed choices, and also not be judged for those choices either. The fact is that for some conditions, women actually get their life back after having a hysterectomy and I talk about all of this and more in this video blog.

 

The No Uterus No Comment speech needs to stop 1

Why the “No Uterus – No Comment” speech on forums needs to stop!

In this latest video post I talk about why the “No Uterus-No Comment” speech on forums needs to stop.

As someone who is a Master of Women’s Health Medicine, a Women’s Health Expert, and work tirelessly to be a voice for women’s health issues (And a Male), I have a very frank and blunt discussion about some of the male bashing hate speech comments that get thrown around various forums.

Have a listen to the latest video blog on this very important topic.

mother and daughter 1

Parents, Don’t Let Your Daughters Suffer With The Wait & See Approach For Period Pain

One of the things I find myself saying to parents often is “Please don’t let your daughter suffer with the wait and see approach for period pain.”

The reason I often say this is because daily I get messages from parents, mainly mothers, asking if they should wait and see if their daughters pain (and other symptoms) is miraculously going to go away. Many of these young girls have been putting up with pain for months, or longer, and still many parents are using the “wait and see” approach.

Many of these messages often start with the story that their daughter is laying on the bathroom floor in excruciating pain. The stories usually add in that their daughters may also have symptoms of nausea, headaches, vomiting and even stories of these poor young girls passing out with pain.

Then there is the usual response of “I used to get period pain and associated symptoms like this and I just had to learn to live with it”

Then comes the question I always hear so often- “Do you think I should wait and see if this just goes away, or do you think I should take her to someone to have her checked out?”

I often have to bite my tongue when responding to questions and stories such as this. If my daughter was laying on a bathroom floor each month, and in excruciating pain, there is no way I would be waiting and seeing if her pain is going to miraculously disappear. The first time she had pain, I would be off doing something about it, and I would not be taking no for an answer.

Many parents suffered period pain themselves

There is always several ways to look at this and why I always offer an empathic response. Many parents were in pain themselves and went through similar experiences. Many of these same parents were told to suck it up and that this is what a woman has to put up with each month. So to them, this is reality. This is their norm. They suffered, so it is natural for them to believe that their daughter just has to wait and see and suffer it out too.

But, as I say to these parents, these symptoms that your daughter is experiencing are not normal. Period pain and all the other terrible associated symptoms are not normal. No woman, young or older, should have to put up with excruciating pains related to her cycle, or an undiagnosed gynaecological condition.

I then go on to explain that I have daughters and that there is no way I would wait and see, before getting help. I also explain that on a health perspective, there are many dangers in letting a young woman suffer such a horrible experience.

The cause of period pain could affect future fertility

I often have to explain the implications of leaving a disease and not intervening early enough. The explanation of by not getting early intervention could mean that they may not ever have grand children, is usually enough to spur many a mother into prompt action. But, it should not have to take these words to prompt someone into action.

Gynaecological conditions cause period pain

The facts are clear now. There is enough education out there. The simple fact is that period pain (and associated symptoms) is not normal and this usually means that there is an undiagnosed gynaecological condition causing the issue. One of the most common causes being endometriosis, or adenomyosis, or both combined. There could be other facts such as pelvic congestion syndrome, or worst still, though rare, there could be something more sinister such as cancer.

Sexually Transmitted Infections

The other thing that parents may not like to admit is that their daughter may actually be having sex and has a Sexually Transmitted Infection (STI). I often have parents interject when asking if a teenager is sexually active. Many a parent answer “No” on the teenagers behalf, only to then learn that their little girl is having sex.

Sexually transmitted diseases (STI’s) can cause permanent damage to reproductive organs and future fertility if not treated early enough. The reality is that many young girls, and boys, are having sex at a very young age, regardless of what parents may believe. Parents do need to open to the possibility that their child’s pain could in fact be related to being sexually active.

The things parents need to know

The things I am trying to educate all parents on are the following:

  1. No matter what anyone tell you, health professional included, ‘period pain is not normal’
  2. Please do not use the wait and see approach when your daughter is in pain, and has been for months.
  3. Women do not needlessly need to put up with pain each month.
  4. Early intervention is the key to treating and managing any disease or health issue
  5. Teenagers are not too young to have endometriosis, or other gynaecological issues.
  6. Many gynaecological issues are hereditary, so if a parent had period pain, or a diagnosed gynaecological issue, then there is a good chance their daughter will have the same.
  7. Parents should not feel guilty, or blame themselves for passing on hereditary issues. All of us have faulty genes.
  8. Regardless of upbringing, or moral stances, teenagers are having sex earlier these days
  9. Teenagers can have sexually transmitted diseases
  10. The earlier intervention is enacted and proper treatment and health management administered, the better the future fertility and health outcomes are for young woman.
  11. Without early intervention, some parents may never become grandparents.
  12. General practitioners are no gynaecologists, so please make sure you get referred onto a proper specialist. If not, find another GP.
  13. If you don’t get help with the first healthcare practitioner you see, please remember the value or a second, or tenth opinion.

I do get that many parent’s have been led to believe that period pain, and other associated symptoms are just part of live and something that I woman just has to put up with. I am sorry for those that were told this and then have put up with this when they didn’t have to.

Period pain is not normal

Please know that you daughter does not need to put up with these symptoms. Period pain is not normal and early intervention is the key to help your daughter live a happy and pain free life. It could really also help save her from the heartache many women have to live with daily. It could also help with her being able to have children of her own.

Do not use the wait and see approach for period pain

Never use the wait and see approach when it comes to period pain and the other associated menstrual symptoms. You daughter will thank you one day and I am sure her children will thank you too. Lead by example so that your daughter can lead by example to daughter, or daughters too.

Final word

If you do need help with your daughters period pain, and other associated symptoms, please give my friendly staff a call and find out how I may be able to help. There are in person and online consultation available. Conditions may apply with online consultations. My staff will explain all this to you when you make your enquiry, or book a consultation.

Regards

Andrew Orr

-No Stone Left Unturned

-Master of Women’s Health Medicine

-The Women’s Health Experts

 

 

 

 

Pelvic Congestion Syndrome 1 1

Let’s Talk About Pelvic Congestion Syndrome

Millions of women world-wide suffer from chronic pelvic pain. One of the causes of chronic pelvic pain is a condition called Pelvic Congestion Syndrome and it is not often talked about. I thought it was important to share this information to bring more awareness to this syndrome.

Pelvic congestion syndrome does share many of the same symptoms of endometriosis and adenomyosis and it important to have proper differential diagnosis and rule other causes of pelvic pain out first. Sometimes the varicose veins that cause pelvic congestion syndrome can be present alongside endometriosis and adenomyosis, or other pelvic issues.

In the past, a diagnosis of chronic pelvic pain left many women frustrated with few treatment options and a lack of available resources. Their doctors were often left perplexed, despite the endless negative laboratory test and imaging data as well as inconclusive consultations obtained.

In the last 10 years, improved medical understanding and increased awareness have lessened the confusion surrounding this condition and its distinct association with pelvic congestion syndrome (PCS). There are now more minimally invasive surgical solutions which give affected patients more treatments choices as well.

So what is Pelvic Congestion Syndrome (PCS)?

Pelvic congestion syndrome (PCS) is a chronic condition that occurs in women when varicose veins form below the abdomen within the pelvic region. Pelvic congestion is just like the varicose veins that some women have in their legs, but it affects the veins of the pelvis. Blood backs up in the veins, making them become enlarged and engorged. Pelvic congestion can also cause chronic pelvic pain in some women.

What are the symptoms of Pelvic Congestion Syndrome?

The main symptom of pelvic congestion syndrome is pelvic pain that lasts at least 6 months. The pain may be a heavy or aching feeling. Or the pain may be sharp. Usually the pain is only on one side, usually the left side. At times you may feel it on both sides. The pain is often worse at the end of the day. If PCS occurs in pregnancy it often first starts during or after a pregnancy. It may worsen after a later pregnancy.

Symptoms of Pelvic Congestions Syndrome can include the following.

  • Pain starts 7-10 days before your period
  • Pelvic pain is worse when you sit or stand
  • Lying down relieves pelvic pain
  • Varicose veins around the vulva, buttocks, and legs
  • Abnormal vaginal discharge
  • Swelling of the vagina or vulva
  • Tenderness of the abdomen
  • Pain during sex
  • Dysmenorrhea (painful menstruation)
  • Abnormal bleeding during menstruation
  • Backache
  • Depression
  • Fatigue
  • Increased urination
  • Irritable bowel symptoms
  • Hip pain
  • Lower back pain
  • Aches in your legs

The syndrome often causes a constant dull pain in the pelvic area that is said to worsen at different times of the cycle and in different situations. Experts believe it can be the source of pain in up to 30% of women who have chronic pelvic pain.

How is at Risk?

It’s more likely to develop in women who have previously given birth, but it can be found in women who have not had children. It is also hereditary so if someone in the family has it, you may be at a higher risk of having it.

What Are The Causes of PCS?

It is still not fully understood what the cause of pelvic congestion syndrome is. There may be multiple factors and causes.

Enlarged veins in the pelvis seem to play a major role. These large veins do play a major role in those that have chronic pelvic pain, but many women have enlarged veins and no symptoms.

Pregnancy may increase the risk for pelvic congestion syndrome. This is because veins enlarge during pregnancy to support the increased blood flow. This can permanently enlarge the veins and lead to symptoms.

Just like endometriosis and adenomyosis, hormones may also play a role in pelvic congestion syndrome. It is though that estrogen may play a big part of this by making veins wider (dilates). We do know that estrogen does drive disease inflammatory states. We also know that PCS is less common after menopause when estrogen levels tend to be lower.. Other hormones may also cause veins to grow wider and cause symptoms.

Excess weight and increased body fat may also cause increased inflammation and estrogenic response that leads to pelvic congestion syndrome.

Other factors such as dietary and lifestyle factors may exacerbate this condition as well.

How is it diagnosed?

PCS can be quite difficult to diagnose, and will need a multimodality approach to be able to firstly diagnose this properly and then apply appropriate treatment. PCS often requires a multidisciplinary approach because the differential diagnosis is quite long and varied. As mentioned before, some of the symptoms are the same as other inflammatory conditions such as endometriosis and adenomyosis. Multiple diagnostic procedures are needed to eliminate other possible causes for your symptoms. These procedures can include:

  • Ultrasound
  • Laparoscopy (keyhole surgery)
  • CT scan
  • MRI scan
  • Venogram

Ultrasound is often preferred as the first step in diagnosing PCS, as it is possible to detect the varicosities as well as assess the blood flow. The only problem with ultrasound is that is that it may not always pick the varicosities up.

MRI may be needed, but even then, laparoscopy is the only procedure to definitely diagnose this condition. I often explain to women that if they have been in pain for a long time, the best option is a laparoscopy. This can also be used to exclude other pelvic pathology and also check to see if there is endometriosis etc too. Sometimes the varicosities may need to be tied off surgically as well and can be done via laparoscopy. Laparoscopy is the gold standard investigation of the pelvis and why it is the best option.

There may need to be input from other health professionals and modalities such as gynaecologists, anaesthesiologist, gastroenterologist, advanced trained laparoscopic surgeon, neurologist, haematologist, oncologist, psychiatrist, and urologist or urodynamic specialist may also be necessary. If someone sees a lot of this syndrome then they will be able to differentiate this without the need of involving too many other areas of medicine, but all other pathology and disease states do need to be carefully ruled out first.

When I help women with PCS, I have a very specialised team of healthcare professionals I work with that see this syndrome often and know what to look for very quickly and promptly. This is why it is very important to see the right people who know about these particular areas of women’s health conditions.

Treatments for Pelvic Congestion Syndrome 

Treatment for pelvic congestion syndrome is usually aimed at reducing and alleviating symptoms. Unfortunately, like endometriosis, there is no definite cure for the condition, and it can be challenging to treat if you don’t get to see the right healthcare practitioner, or healthcare team.

There are medications available to help relieve symptoms of PCS and these can include:

  • NSAIDs (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs)
  • chronic pain medications (such as gabapentin plus amitriptyline)

The most successful treatment currently is a minimally invasive surgical procedure called pelvic vein/ovarian vein embolization (PVE/OVE). This procedure blocks off the faulty varicose veins so that they can no longer enlarge with blood, thereby relieving the pain. that are believed to be the source of pain.

Embolization (PVE/OVE) offers a safe, effective, minimally invasive treatment option that is less expensive to surgery and less invasive. It is an outpatient hospital procedure which requires only conscious sedation. Once the procedure is performed, you can return home a few hours later the same day. Medical literature shows that the procedure provides complete or partial relief in approximately 90% – 95% of the cases. As with any procedure, there are risks, and not all women may be appropriate for this treatment option.

A laparoscopy may still be needed to definitely diagnose the varicose veins first, before embolization can be performed. This is why diagnosis and treatment of PCS does require a step by step multimodality approach. This is something that needs to be clearly understood.

Outlook

PCS isn’t a condition that is life threatening, but it does have the potential to significantly affect your quality of life. Symptoms such as chronic pain, pain during sexual intercourse, and dysmenorrhea can lead to a decrease in physical activity, loss of function, and depression. It can make daily life very hard and make it difficult to function in your personal and work life.

A diagnosis does not necessarily mean you will be affected to this extent and PCS varies greatly in terms of severity for each person. Not all women with PCS will have their daily life affected and some do not get pain at all.

The good thing is that there are treatments available to minimize the symptoms and help sufferers cope with this condition. It is important that you talk to your healthcare practitioner if you do have any of the symptoms of PCS.

It’s also important to talk to your healthcare practitioner about counseling, if needed, to help you cope with the significant chronic pain that can go along with having PCS. Chronic pain can impact on an emotional and psychological level and this can then lead to further exacerbation of pain. Many people just do not realise the impact the stress and emotions and mood disorders can have on pain conditions.

Last word

If you do have chronic pelvic pain and need assistance with diagnosis and management please give my friendly staff a call and ask how I may be able to assist you. I also work in with a good network of healthcare professions to help my patients get the best care possible. My motto is No Stone Left Unturned and I apply this to everyone that comes to see me for assistance with their health condition.

Regards

Andrew Orr

-No Stone Left Unturned

-Master of Women’s Health Medicine

-The Women’s Health Experts

 

 

10 Common Mistake seen with

10 Common Mistakes Seen With Endometriosis

1 in 10 women are diagnosed with endometriosis and it often takes up to 10 years to be diagnosed. The number 10 seems to be a recurring theme. So, for this post I am going to talk about the 10 common mistakes seen with endometriosis. Hopefully this helps to create some more awareness about this horrible disease and helps those who are suffering, or have not been diagnosed yet.

Below are the ten common mistakes I see with endometriosis.

1. Believing surgery has cured their disease

Many people with endometriosis are often led to believe, or have been told, that once they have surgery that their endometriosis is cured.

There is no cure for endometriosis, so surgery is not a cure. Hysterectomy is not a cure either.

All surgery does is deal with the expressed disease and that is it. It does not prevent further regrowth of the microscopic implants of endometriosis that are waiting to express and develop into lesions again. While surgery is a very valid medical option to address acute pain caused by the disease, it is not a cure. It only helps with symptomatic relief.

2. Not doing follow-up management of the disease after surgery

We know that despite the best medical interventions that women with endometriosis often will still be in pain, or have further expression and regrowth of the disease.

As mentioned previously, surgery is a valid treatment option for acute pain and for when hormones and medications are not working. But, from my experience I do see many have the surgery and then are not doing any ongoing management, except for pain medications. This isn’t necessarily the person’s own fault either. Many are also poorly managed post surgery and are not aware that they will need ongoing management of their disease state. As mentioned, many are literally just unaware that their disease can, and will grow back without ongoing support and healthcare management. It is crucial that all women with endometriosis receive ongoing care and management of their disease from an appropriately trained endometriosis expert.

3. Endometriosis care requires a multimodality/team approach

There is no one single medicine, or modality, that can effectively deal with endometriosis and this is why a multimodality/team approach is needed.

Surgery is just one treatment approach, which is also needed to definitively diagnose the disease, and then for when the disease is acute and nothing else is working. But surgery alone is not adequate to deal with the disease as a stand alone therapy.

Endometriosis is estrogen driven so there does need to be some form of progesterone support to help suppress further expression of the disease. This can be in varying forms and something I will discuss in another post.

There also need to be support of the microbiome and working on the microcirculation to the pelvic area and reproductive organs. There also need to be ongoing emotional support and care such as counselling, or psychology

There also needs to be dietary changes (low inflammatory based diet), physiotherapy, exercise, complementary medicines, acupuncture, nutritional medicine other modalities. All of this can be done alongside ongoing medications and medical support. Each individual with the disease has different symptoms and will require different multimodality care and support, based on their individual needs.

4. Not seeing the right surgeon

I know I always talk about it, but this is because many who are suffering from endometriosis and the associated symptoms, just have not seen the right person in the first place.

In every profession there is good and bad. There are those who specialise in a certain area, and there are those who don’t. The same goes for medicine and the same goes for surgeons too.

When needing a diagnosis, or surgical intervention for endometriosis, it is imperative to see an advanced trained laparoscopic surgeon who specialises in the excision of endometriosis. This way you also know that this surgeon is not only advanced trained and highly skilled, but also specialises in endometriosis and every aspect of it.

Not all gynaecologists and surgeons specialise in endometriosis and some dabble in it and are not highly skilled in the actual surgical requirements to effectively excise the disease properly. Some surgeons do not even do excision surgery and tend to just to ablation only. This is not how you surgical deal with endometriosis.

These advanced trained surgeons also have to do a certain number of surgeries per year to attain the status of being advanced trained. Someone who does a few surgeries here and there is definitely not advanced trained. These advanced trained surgeons also do extra years of surgical training and are the best of the best and why anyone who is suspected of having endometriosis, or has endometriosis need to see these surgeons only.

Too many women are under-serviced surgical, by poorly skilled surgeons, who are not specialised in endometriosis and who are not advanced trained and this is where all the problems start. It can also lead to making the patient worse and only leads to further suffering and years of pain as a result. It also means that the advanced trained surgeons then have to fix up the mess these other surgeons created.

The hard thing is some women are limited by demographic and location when it comes to being able to see an advanced trained surgeon. Unfortunately most of them do private work, and any in the public system have long waiting lists and may only do one day a week public surgical lists. You may not even get to see them unless you see them privately first and they put you on there public waiting list.

5. Not seeking help and intervention early enough

There is two parts to this that need attention and need discussion. We know that it often takes up to 10 years (or more) to be diagnosed with endometriosis. This means that a hell of a lot of women are being missed and dismissed by GP’s, allied healthcare practitioners, complementary medicine practitioners, specialists and so forth. This isn’t meant to be negative, or an attack on any one profession. These are the facts and something that cannot be ignored. It also needs to be discussed.

Then we also have parents waiting way too long to seek help for daughters, using the wait and see if it will go away approach. I see this often and I am often getting asked if a parent should just wait and see if their daughters pain will magically disappear. I often have to point out that if my daughter was passing out, or laying on a bathroom floor crying with pain, I would not be waiting to see if it was going to go away. Early intervention is the key to any disease. The wait and see approach is often the reason many women end up with years of fertility issues and years of pain, and other associated symptoms of endometriosis. The longer a disease is left to spread, the more damage it does, and the harder it is to treat.

Teenagers are not too young to have endometriosis and we are now seeing young girls as young as 5 years old having endometriosis found.

The other issue we see if women who know that they have the disease, putting off seeing someone for fear of more surgery, or fear of being dismissed. Again, this only leads to further complications and disease growth and thing being harder to treat.

Once a woman has endometriosis, the reality is that she may need further surgical intervention. But, it is needed to help with symptomatic relief and reduce inflammatory response in the body. The other thing is that by going and seeing someone who specialises in endometriosis, they are trained to help you manage your disease properly.

There may also be some non-surgical options that can be used and help with symptoms and disease management as well. But, you need to go in the first place, to get the help you need. Please do not put off getting your health and disease state managed properly. If you are in a bad place with your disease, make sure you get on that phone and book yourself in with someone who specialises in endometriosis.

6. Trying to manage the disease by yourself

I’ve covered this a bit in the last statement, but so often I see women trying to manage endometriosis themselves. This only leads to a vicious cycle that keeps going around and around and nothing good ever comes of it. The disease does not get managed properly, the symptoms get worse and then it all becomes way harder to effectively treat and manage.

Sometimes if things are left too long, there can be permanent damage that is not repairable. This is definitely why people should not try to manage their own disease and symptoms themselves.

If your disease state and associated symptoms are out of control and you aren’t being managed properly, please get on that phone and book in to see someone as soon as possible. Do not put it off any longer. Now is the time to do something about it, not tomorrow, or next year.

7. Getting medical advice from support groups

I am a big advocator of anyone with a long-term health issue receiving emotional and physical support. It is a must. But, it needs to be via trained professionals who are specialised to help you properly.

While I am also a big fan of support groups, I am not a fan of non-medically trained, non-healthcare people giving healthcare and medical advice to people within these groups. I love seeing the emotional support in these groups, but I don’t love it when I see people getting medical advice about medications, hormones and medical procedures. This is dangerous. I’ve even seen advice given on how to take ones own IUD out and this is when I have to speak out.

By getting medication advice, medical advice, surgical advice and any other healthcare advice from someone who is not appropriately trained, you are actually putting yourself in great danger. Please do not take the advice of anyone who is not a healthcare practitioner, or a specialist in endometriosis. Sure, get the emotional support from like minded people, and people who understand what you are going through, but leave it there.

The other thing is just being careful of not getting caught up in some of the negativity of some groups, where you also then start to focus and become your disease. You are not your disease and to move forward you need proper healthcare and lots of positivity.

8. Letting pain and associated symptoms get out of hand

Some of this I’ve also spoken about, but this is one thing I see often as well. Many people are at a point of self-managing with pain medications that are not working effectively any longer. This then leads to increased reliance and dependence of pain medications and it can also lead to increase pain and associated symptoms.

I have talked about pain medications and the withdrawal affects in previous posts. I have also talked about how increased pain medication use can actually cause pain and lead to further inflammation in the body. I have also talked about the addiction of pain medications too. It is a catch 22 situation. (Click here to see previous posts mentioned)

The point I am trying to make here is that if your pain levels and associated symptoms are getting out of hand, then you need to do something about it. Please do not try and manage your pain and symptoms on your own. Increasing your medications can have detrimental effects on your body and long term health consequences.

If you have to increase your pain medications, it means something is drastically wrong and that your pain levels need urgent professional attention. Your endometriosis expert/specialist is trained to help you get your pain levels and associated symptoms managed properly.

There may also be something else going on that could be sinister and require urgent medical attention. Never presume that all your symptoms are related to your disease. Seeking proper medical health and ongoing management, could just save your life.

9. Buying into the label and letting your disease own you

Having a chronic health condition myself, I know all too well how easy it is to fall it the trap of buying into the label of the disease. I also know all too well by doing this, you are letting the disease own you.

I also understand how hard it is on the bad days, not to get down about everything and think that there is no help, and how unfair things are. Yep, I truly get it. But, I also know that the more one focuses on the negative, and constantly lives in the disease state, the harder it is to truly move forward and get better.

Our thoughts and being negative can exacerbate pain pathways and they can also disrupt the healing pathways as well. If you listen to people that have overcome and illness, or a disease, they will always tell you it was by getting the right help and being positive. Positive mental outlook is very underrated in healthcare and its healing effects.

This is why I sometimes mention about being careful in certain support groups, where the focus is constantly on the disease, the label, and the negative. It isn’t good for anyone when that is all you hear. You need support, but you need to surround yourself with positive people, see the right healthcare team and also remember that you are not your disease, and it does not own you.

10. Believing that there is no help out there

I know many people have had a hard time and some have really had a terrible journey getting to where they are now. It is one of the reasons I am so big on giving people the facts about this horrible disease and trying to help women get the proper help they need. It is also the reason I do what I do now.

Having lived with a chronic disease and having dealt with my share of really bad experiences, I know all too well what many of you have been through. I thoroughly get it and I understand on all levels.

While many people have been missed and dismissed and many have seen their fair share of terrible healthcare practitioners, I do need to point out that there are some very good ones also. Never let your last experience by carried over with you. Not all healthcare practitioners are bad. There are actually some amazing practitioners out there who are experts in endometriosis.

Like I have said before, in every profession there is good and bad and this is why it is important to do your homework. Don’t just go off a friend’s recommendation, or some recommendation from your mother. Do your homework and make sure the person you are seeing actually specialises in your disease. You also need to be realistic that you need a multimodality team approach, and that you may need to see a few practitioners within a network of specialists.

When you do find someone you think may fit the profile of a true endometriosis specialist, make sure when you see them that they take a full history, listen to all your concerns, give you appropriate care and advice and are empathetic in helping you move forward with appropriate care and health management.

The one thing I tell people is to not go in with a negative attitude based on previous bad experience either. This can then lead to further angst and anxiety and could get a good practitioner offside too. At the same time, while you need to not take your last experience with you, you do need to make sure the person you are seeing is right for you. It is all about balance and not judging each person you see as being the same.

But, if the person you do see has no idea, then don’t be scared to say “Thanks, but not thanks” and be on your merry way. There is no harm in getting multiple opinions and the honest truth is that is what you need to do. Never just take ones person’s advice and be done with it. Get a second, or third, or tenth opinion if you have too.

Last, but not least, if you are struggling and are at a point you believe there is nobody to help you, please remember there is always someone out there. Never give up hope about that. There are some amazing people out there who will know how to help you properly and get you the help and care you need. You just need to find them. There are endometriosis experts out there and when you find them, they will help you.

Final word

If you do need help and assistance with endometriosis, or need help getting diagnosed properly, please give my staff a call, or send an email, and find out how I may be able to assist you. I do consultations in person and online as well. There are some conditions with online consultations, but my staff will explain all this too you. You may also need to come and see me in person, so I can make sure you get all the appropriate investigations and testing done too. I also have a team of experts I work and refer to as well. I do see people from all over Australia, far and wide, and some from overseas as well.

Take care

Regards

Andrew Orr

-No Stone Left Unturned

-The Endometriosis Experts

 

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Endometriosis is more than just period pain

The Australian Institute of Health and Welfare has just released a report on Endometriosis – “Prevalence and hospitalisations”. I thought it was important to talk about this and share this information in a previous post.

When I did post this information on social media, with an explanation about endometriosis being more than just period pain, someone had commented and congratulated me for acknowledging that endometriosis has other associated symptoms as well.

One of the things I see with media reporting on anything to do with endometriosis, is that they always refer to endometriosis as just being about period pain. So I wanted to talk about the importance of recognising that endometriosis is more than just period pain.

Endometriosis has many other associated symptoms and is more than just period pain, which it is often portrays it as in the media. Endometriosis flares can happen at anytime and aren’t always related to a woman’s menstrual cycle.

Have a listen to my latest video post about this subject and some other useful information to know about endometriosis.

Understanding Why Hysterectomy Does Not Cure Endometriosis

Hey everyone. I’ve just recently put up a post about the facts about why hysterectomy does not cure endometriosis.

It seems this is a very contentious issue and many people are not understanding the facts, or how endometriosis presents in the body. I also think that some people just haven’t read the actual article, as I do explain all of the reasons why.

But, it does seem some people are still not getting the reasons why, or have been told the wrong things. As usual, I am here to give the facts and this is what I am here to do with this post.. Give the facts.

I am sorry for many of the journeys you have been on too and that some of you are not being listened too as well. That is why I am here. To raise awareness and give the facts and help women with endometriosis have a voice.

This is to also raise awareness about adenomyosis too. Many really do not realise that they have this disease state, or have it coinciding with endometriosis as well.

So, I have done up the video blog to explain things in more detail and hopefully it helps all of you understand things better. It is also so people can see a visual explanation and see why hysterectomy will not “Cure” endometriosis.