woman 687560 1920

Is it Endometriosis, or Adenomyosis, or both?

Endometriosis and Adenomyosis can often present with the same symptoms and many now believe they may be one in the same disease, just in different locations. Despite both of them sharing similar symptoms, there are pointers for properly trained professional to which disease may be presenting. Both diseases are often missed and dismissed as well. To learn more about Endometriosis, or Adenomyosis please click on the hyperlinks.

I have recently put up posts about hysterectomy not being a cure for endometriosis. It often causes lots of people to question this statement, because some uneducated healthcare practitioner has told them differently. Some may have had some relief from having a hysterectomy and now believe their endometriosis has gone.

Before I go any further, I do need people to know the facts. Hysterectomy DOES NOT cure endometriosis, but is can help Adenomyosis. There is no cure for endometriosis. I have explained the reasons why in my resent post Hysterectomy DOES NOT cure endometriosis. Please click on the hyperlink to find out the facts.

Many women who have Endometriosis, or Adenomyosis are often missed and dismissed for up to 10 years or more, before a diagnosis is made. This is due to the fact that many healthcare practitioners do not know the symptoms of these disease states, or dismissed them as being normal. That is a fact. This is why it is important to see someone who specialises in Endometriosis, or Adenomyosis.

With both Endometriosis and Adenomyosis, they share many common symptoms such as:

  • Painful periods
  • Pain with intercourse
  • Ovulation Pain
  • Dark and clotted menstrual blood
  • Digestive upset
  • Pain on bowel movement
  • Bowel or bladder issues
  • IBS like symptoms
  • Pelvic pain and rectal pressure
  • Infertility

What is the difference between Endometriosis and Adenomyosis?

The one thing that usually sets them apart is that Adenomyosis usually has more heavy menstrual bleeding, abnormal uterine bleeding and more flooding symptoms. Endometriosis can have this too, but usually adenomyosis presents with more blood loss symptoms and abnormal bleeding.

Endometriosis ‘cannot’ be definitively diagnosed via ultrasound, or MRI, but adenomyosis can be diagnosed via both of those methods. Endometriosis can only be definitively diagnosed via surgical intervention (laparoscopy). This is the biggest difference with the two disease states. The other thing is that both disease states can be present at the same time and quite often do.

The biggest issue for many women is that when one disease state it found, the other one is quite often overlooked, or misdiagnosed. Many women, and healthcare professionals, are unaware that both the disease states can be present at the same time and this is a real issue.

Hysterectomy will help Adenomyosis, but it ‘will not’ cure Endometriosis.

As I have mentioned earlier, hysterectomy does not cure endometriosis, but it can help adenomyosis. Many women have been led to believe that hysterectomy will cure their endometriosis and associated symptoms, but this is not true. Some women who have had a hysterectomy and then think they are getting relief from symptoms of endometriosis, but are actually getting relief from adenomyosis not being there anymore. It is just that they did not know it was there, they have never been diagnosed, and then believe their endometriosis is cured. Once the uterus is removed, the adenomyosis is removed too. Then all the adenomyosis abnormal bleeding, period pain and period related symptoms are usually gone as well.

The only trouble is, if a woman has been diagnosed with endometriosis, the endometriosis will still be there. That is a fact. Endometriosis does not miraculously go away after a hysterectomy. Endometriosis is not in the uterus. Some symptoms (usually the menstrual related symptoms) can settle for some people, but for many it does not. Regardless the endometriosis will still be there and can continue to grow and cause havoc elsewhere in the body too.

Proper investigation is important

When women come to see me for help with Endometriosis, or Adenomyosis, I always make sure they are investigated for both disease states. If a women has abnormal uterine bleeding, or heavy menstrual bleeding and they have only been diagnosed with endometriosis, I will always make sure that they are investigated to see if they have Adenomyosis as well. I will also screen for genetic issues such as Von Willebrand’s Disease and other pelvic pathology that may cause bleeding as well. It is also very important that women with both Endometriosis, or Adenomyosis, or both are are also screened for iron deficiency too.

Hope this explains a little bit more about Endometriosis and Adenomyosis and a bit more about which disease state hysterectomy will, or won’t help.

Regards

Dr Andrew Orr

-No Stone Left Unturned

-Women’s Health Expert

Dr Andrew Orr Logo Retina 20 07 2016

Posted in Abnormal Uterine Bleeding, Adenomyosis, Endometriosis, Endometriosis Facts, Genetic Disorders, Gynaecological Conditions, Hysterectomy, Laparoscopy & Hysteroscopy, Pain management, Pain with Sex, Period Pain, Von Willebrand's Disease and tagged , , , , , , .

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *