Microbiome Restore Protocol

Dr Andrew Orr’s Microbiome Restore Protocol

The Purpose Of The Microbiome Restore

Many inflammatory health conditions can be linked to compromised microbiome and poor gut health. There is now good research and evidence to show the importance of microbiome restore.

Within these poor health states, there is often an overgrowth of “bad” bacteria within your gut. This is a crucial part of treatment for these ailments to restore the microbiome and replenish the “good” bacteria. Ressearch has also linked poor gut health to many mental health conditions.

There are many things that impact the microbiome. Refined food commonly found in the typical Western diet, stress, alcohol, drugs, medications, hormones and many other things fosters the growth of this “bad” bacteria, causing inflammation and what we know as ‘dysbiosis’.

Dr Orr’s Microbiome Restore Protocol aims to reduce the intake of these refined foods and others things that impact the microbiome, and and instead foster the growth of “good” bacteria.

The Eating Plan

This eating plan is based on Dr Andrew Orr’s Primal Ancestral Clean Eating (PACE) diet.  It does allow quite a range of foods, so you shouldn’t have any trouble eating at home, or out anywhere. It is important to note that this is not a “diet.” This is simply the way we are supposed to eat.

2 Phase Microbiome Restore Protocol

Prior to starting the microbiome restore will also need to complete some health questionnaires and have a half hour consultation with Dr Andrew. The health questionnaire need to be fully completed and sent back prior to your consultation. All the relevant information will be supplied to you when you enquire, or book your consultation.

Alongside the PACE diet, this Microbiome Restore Protocol also involves supplementation that is set out in two phases. Both phases need to be completed in order to achieve working results.

Please note that the supplements prescribed as part of the microbiome restore protocol are practitioner only prescribed supplements which will require a consultation before they can be prescribed.

Phase 1 – Removal of Bad Bacteria & Gut Lining Repair

The first phase aims to restore the gut lining, remove bad bacteria and microbials, and create an environment in which good bacteria can thrive. Phase 1 will not need to be repeated (unless you wish you repeat the process in the future). It lasts for approximately 4 weeks, or until all of the products are finished. After that, you move on to phase 2 which then is also the maintenance phase.

Phase 2 – Replenishing the Microbiome & Good Gut Bacteria

After removing the bad bacteria, repairing the gut lining, and laying down a foundation for the good bacteria to grow, you will need to recolonise your gut with good bacteria. Strain specific bacteria are used and it will depending on the individual which probiotic strains are used.

Phase 2 aims to replenish the good gut bacteria through the use of Pre and Probiotics. This phase will be ongoing and used as maintenance for your condition. It is extremely important to continue your intake of Pre and Probiotics to ensure proper colonisation of good bacteria and restore on the microbiome.

Important Things To Note

It is important to note that the results of doing the microbiome restore could take months to come into effect and for there to be adequate good bacteria colonisation. It is likely that if you have been recommended to take part in this protocol, that your microbiome is quite compromised due to years of consistent damage. Because of this, it will likely take quite a while to properly restore the microbiome back to equilibrium. This is done by way of continuing with your prebiotics and strain specific healthy bacteria,  to get back on track and eventually feel healthier.

As mentioned previously, many things can impact gut bacteria including stress, alcohol, diet, etc. so it is important to be mindful of this and what you expose your body to on your pathway to recovery.

A good way to think of a damaged microbiome is like any other damaged organ or bone in the body. A broken bone, torn ligament, or damaged internal organ is not likely to heal overnight. It can take months or even years of recovery, rehabilitation or medicinal therapies to get on top of it. The same applies for your digestive tract. It is no exception to the rule in regards to healing time within your body. The best results come when people are consistent in sticking to their treatment plan, and are realistic about time frames and outcomes.

Next Step Is Book Your Consultation

If you need help with restoring your microbiome for better health, then please give my clinic staff a call and find out how my Microbiome Restore Protocol may be able to assist you on the pathway to better health. There are options for online, or in person consultations. Conditions may apply to online consultations.

For further information please call +61 07 38328369, or email info@drandreworr.com.au

References

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