photo of a woman thinking 941555

What Wikipedia Can’t Tell You About Research

One of the things I always hear from my patients is that they did all this extensive research, on why they chose a particular place, particular person, or particular treatment modality. But then I then hear that the last place they went to, or person they saw, or last treatment modality that they did didn’t end up helping them much.

So, if that is the case, what went wrong with all their so called research?

Now, before I start on this article, please know that I always promote that people should be educated on their particular health issue and always try to be fully informed. But, the problem these days, as I have mentioned often, is that ‘Dr Google’ is not a reliable source of education, or credible research for that matter. Nor should it replace a qualified healthcare professional’s advice, or proper credible research.

Is it an extensive search, or proper research?

When patients often say to me that they have researched something, it probably more likely means that have done an extensive search. More often than not, it means it is an extensive google search. As I said before, I recommend people search extensively and do their homework and become fully informed. Being informed gives you choices and this is a good thing.

Searching and research are two completely different things. When it does come to finding quality research, one needs to know how to distinguish between good research and bad research. This is where many come undone, unless they have studied how to evaluate proper research methodology and criteria.

Anyone can create a spectacular medical website

Now days anyone can post anything they like on their website, make it look pretty, quote a few research papers and make their page look like it is backed up with valid research. Let’s face it; making a website is pretty easy these days. It is so easy that your grandmother could do it and make out she was a professor with an academic position.

Current research is via subscription only

The other issue is research that is freely available to the public. Most research freely available to the public is often around 7-10 years old. Most current research is not even available to the public, unless you are studying and have access to university journal subscriptions. Current research is usually only available to academics and health professionals who have paid subscriptions, or who have academic positions. So by the time this free research is then made available to the public, it is usually out of date and superseded by current research.

Knowing how to interpret good quality research

We also have the issue that even if many of the general public could access credible current research, they probably would not be able to interpret it properly anyway. I know when I studied statistics and research criteria it took years to fully know how to interpret proper research and all the research terms. Let’s face it, without proper training most people would be flat out knowing what a T score, Z score, or null hypothesis meant, let alone all the other technical data terms.

Abstracts of research can be misleading

We also see abstracts getting cited to back someone’s claims up. The problem with abstracts is that it is not the full research paper and the headings on these abstracts can falsely convey what the actual research team actually found. I see many people “cherry pick” (meaning chose something to suit ones opinion) research and abstracts of research just to validate a personal opinion and also make it sound like it is factual. This is the whole issue with Dr Googling these days. Much of what is out there is not only not factual, but it is a far cry from what the original research paper actually stated.

There are flaws and lots of bias in research

There can also be high levels of bias in research too, based on who funded the research in the first place. A landmark study into the validity of current medical research showed that much of the published medical research is apparently flawed, cannot be replicated and/or has limited or no value. (1)(2)(3)(4)  This is also why it is important to know how to interpret and critic good quality research and know what is good research, or bad research.

The point I am trying to make is that while many people are searching for answers and looking to find good research, the fact is much of what is out there is very questionable indeed.

Finding out more information

When it comes to good research, or finding a good healthcare practitioner etc, it is like anything else in life. You do a lot of searching, then you narrow you choices down and then you go about finding out more information. The only way you are really going to know if you the information you are seeing on some website it factual is to ask to find out more information.

The value of a second opinion

I always tell my patients the value of a second, or third, or tenth opinion. It is like buying a car, or buying anything for that matter. You need to do the search and then go and find out in person. Ask the staff questions and then ask for an appointment to see whom you have searched up and found may be good for you to see. Then you need to meet the person and see if they stack up to how they are portraying themselves online. Do they know their stuff, or it is all just smoke and mirrors and just good advertising?

Get help to interpret research papers

If it is purely research you are looking at, find out if the actual research is factual and done via good research methodology. If you don’t know how to interpret research, then find someone who does. Never just go blindly off abstracts (eg –pubmed abstracts), or second hand research published on newsfeeds, or websites. Honestly, most good research is behind closed doors where you have to pay for it and if you aren’t paying for it, there is probably a good reason why it is being offered freely to all.

What to look for when searching and researching

When doing your searches, or research as many call it, then you need to be looking at the following:

  1. Where did you find the research? – Was it from a reputable source? (eg- paid journal)
  2. Was the information about the research interpreted by someone then posted in their own words? – Did they site the actual research they are referencing?
  3. Does the research have the potential to be biased? – (eg- a research paper stating softdrink is good for you and funded by a softdrink company)
  4. If it is a healthcare facility, or person you are searching, does their research seem like it is legitimate? – Is the information on their website directly created by personal opinion and do they back their words up with research and referencing?
  5. Does the person you are intending to see have backing to show they are an expert in what you are going to see them for? – (eg- do they post blogs on the subject you are needing to see them for, or does their website say that they are an expert in a particular field?
  6. Does the facility, or person, seem genuine, or does their website just seem like money grabbing and a fancy advertising stunt to lure people in?

Final Note

At the end of the day, in this current day and age, everything needs to be met with the caution of “Buyer Beware”. This goes for anyone you are searching (or go to see), or any information you find on the internet. Just do your homework and make sure who you are seeing, or what you are reading is legitimate.

But at the same time, when you do go and see someone, you do need to have an open mind and not go in with resistance either. This could get a genuine person offside and then ruin your chances of getting the help off someone really good. Never project your last experience onto the next person because the next person could be the one to help you.

Just remember that your new degree in Dr Google research may not be as good as the person’s real degree, education and clinical experience you are sitting in front of. But at the same time, the so called expert in front of you may not be an expert, just because they have a great website with all the glitz and glamour on it.

 

Regards

Andrew Orr

-No Stone Left Unturned

-Master of Women’s Health Medicine

-Master of Reproductive Medicine

-Women’s and Men’s Health Advocate

 

References

  1. Protect us from poor-quality medical research- Human Reproduction, Volume 33, Issue 5, May 2018, Pages 770–776, https://doi.org/10.1093/humrep/dey056
  2. Altman DG. The scandal of poor medical research. Br Med J 1994;308:283
  3. Core Outcomes in Women’s Health (CROWN) Initiative. The CROWN Initiative: journal editors invite researchers to develop core outcomes in women’s health. Hum Reprod 2014;29:1349–1350.
  4. Flacco ME, Manzoli L, Boccia S, Capasso L, Aleksovska K, Rosso A, Scaioli G, De Vito C, Siliquini R, Villari P et al. . Head-to-head randomized trials are mostly industry-sponsored and almost always favour the industry sponsor. J Clin Epidemiol  2015;
Microbiome Restore Protocol

Dr Andrew Orr’s Microbiome Restore Protocol

The Purpose Of The Microbiome Restore

Many inflammatory health conditions can be linked to compromised microbiome and poor gut health. There is now good research and evidence to show the importance of microbiome restore.

Within these poor health states, there is often an overgrowth of “bad” bacteria within your gut. This is a crucial part of treatment for these ailments to restore the microbiome and replenish the “good” bacteria. Ressearch has also linked poor gut health to many mental health conditions.

There are many things that impact the microbiome. Refined food commonly found in the typical Western diet, stress, alcohol, drugs, medications, hormones and many other things fosters the growth of this “bad” bacteria, causing inflammation and what we know as ‘dysbiosis’.

Dr Orr’s Microbiome Restore Protocol aims to reduce the intake of these refined foods and others things that impact the microbiome, and and instead foster the growth of “good” bacteria.

The Eating Plan

This eating plan is based on Dr Andrew Orr’s Primal Ancestral Clean Eating (PACE) diet.  It does allow quite a range of foods, so you shouldn’t have any trouble eating at home, or out anywhere. It is important to note that this is not a “diet.” This is simply the way we are supposed to eat.

2 Phase Microbiome Restore Protocol

Prior to starting the microbiome restore will also need to complete some health questionnaires and have a half hour consultation with Dr Andrew. The health questionnaire need to be fully completed and sent back prior to your consultation. All the relevant information will be supplied to you when you enquire, or book your consultation.

Alongside the PACE diet, this Microbiome Restore Protocol also involves supplementation that is set out in two phases. Both phases need to be completed in order to achieve working results.

Please note that the supplements prescribed as part of the microbiome restore protocol are practitioner only prescribed supplements which will require a consultation before they can be prescribed.

Phase 1 – Removal of Bad Bacteria & Gut Lining Repair

The first phase aims to restore the gut lining, remove bad bacteria and microbials, and create an environment in which good bacteria can thrive. Phase 1 will not need to be repeated (unless you wish you repeat the process in the future). It lasts for approximately 4 weeks, or until all of the products are finished. After that, you move on to phase 2 which then is also the maintenance phase.

Phase 2 – Replenishing the Microbiome & Good Gut Bacteria

After removing the bad bacteria, repairing the gut lining, and laying down a foundation for the good bacteria to grow, you will need to recolonise your gut with good bacteria. Strain specific bacteria are used and it will depending on the individual which probiotic strains are used.

Phase 2 aims to replenish the good gut bacteria through the use of Pre and Probiotics. This phase will be ongoing and used as maintenance for your condition. It is extremely important to continue your intake of Pre and Probiotics to ensure proper colonisation of good bacteria and restore on the microbiome.

Important Things To Note

It is important to note that the results of doing the microbiome restore could take months to come into effect and for there to be adequate good bacteria colonisation. It is likely that if you have been recommended to take part in this protocol, that your microbiome is quite compromised due to years of consistent damage. Because of this, it will likely take quite a while to properly restore the microbiome back to equilibrium. This is done by way of continuing with your prebiotics and strain specific healthy bacteria,  to get back on track and eventually feel healthier.

As mentioned previously, many things can impact gut bacteria including stress, alcohol, diet, etc. so it is important to be mindful of this and what you expose your body to on your pathway to recovery.

A good way to think of a damaged microbiome is like any other damaged organ or bone in the body. A broken bone, torn ligament, or damaged internal organ is not likely to heal overnight. It can take months or even years of recovery, rehabilitation or medicinal therapies to get on top of it. The same applies for your digestive tract. It is no exception to the rule in regards to healing time within your body. The best results come when people are consistent in sticking to their treatment plan, and are realistic about time frames and outcomes.

Next Step Is Book Your Consultation

If you need help with restoring your microbiome for better health, then please give my clinic staff a call and find out how my Microbiome Restore Protocol may be able to assist you on the pathway to better health. There are options for online, or in person consultations. Conditions may apply to online consultations.

For further information please call +61 07 38328369, or email info@drandreworr.com.au

References

  1. Walker A, et al. Phylogeny, culturing, and metagenomics of the human gut microbiota. Trends Microbiol. 2014;22:267–74.
  2. Collado MC, et al. Role of commercial probiotic strains against human pathogen adhesion to intestinal mucus. Lett Appl Microbiol. 2007;45(4):454-60.
  3. Leahy SC, et al. Getting better with bifidobacteria. J Appl Microbiol. 2005;98(6):1303-15.
  4. McFarland LV. Systematic review and meta-analysis of Saccharomyces boulardii in adult patients. World J Gastroenterol. 2010;16(18):2202-22.
  5. Jahn HU, et al. Immunological and trophical effects of Saccharomyces boulardii on the small intestine in healthy human volunteers. Digestion. 1996;57(2):95-104.
  6. Jahn HU, et al. Immunological and trophical effects of Saccharomyces boulardii on the small intestine in healthy human volunteers. Digestion. 1996;57(2):95-104.
  7. Dahan S, et al. Saccharomyces boulardii interferes with enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli induced signaling pathways in T84 cells. Infect Immun. 2003;71:766-773.
  8. Hsieh H. Versalovic J. The human microbiome and probiotics: Implications for pediatrics. Curr Probl Pediatr Adolesc Health Care. 2008;38(10):309–327.
  9. Lam EK, et al. Enhancement of gastric mucosal integrity by Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG. Life Sci. 2007;80(23):2128-36.
  10. Seth A, et al. Probiotics ameliorate the hydrogen peroxide-induced epithelial barrier disruption by a PKC- and MAP kinase-dependent mechanism. Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol. 2008;294(4):G1060-9.
  11. Gibson GR. Roberford M. Dietary modulation of the human colonic microbiota: introducing the concept of prebiotics. J Nutr. 1995;125:1401-1412.
  12. Fastinger ND, et al. A novel resistant maltodextrin alters gastrointestinal tolerance factors, fecal characteristics, and fecal microbiota in healthy adult humans. J Am Coll Nutr. 2008;27(2):356-66.
  13. Raninen K, et al. Dietary fiber type reflects physiological functionality: comparison of grain fiber, inulin, and polydextrose. Nutr Rev. 2011;69(1):9-21.
  14. Robison LE. Reeves S. EpiCor® and its immune effects on gut health. Embria Health Sciences, LLC. [Online]. No date. Available from: http://www.embriahealth.com/upload/pdf/EpiCor%20Science%20%20EpiCor%20and%20its%20Immune%20Effects%20on%20Gut%20Health_FINAL.pdf [Cited 16/02/13].
  15. Jensen GS, et al. Antioxidant bioavailability and rapid immune-modulating effects after consumption of a single acute dose of a high-metabolite yeast immunogen: results of a placebo-controlled double-blinded crossover pilot study. J Med Food. 2011 Sep;14(9):1002-10.
  16. Bartoli, C., Frachon, L., Barret, M., Huard-Chauveau, C., Mayjonade, B., Zanchetta, C., … & Roux, F. (2018, May 30). In situ relationships between microbiota and potential pathobiota in Arabidopsis thaliana. The ISME Journal. Retrieved from https://www.nature.com/articles/s41396-018-0152-7#article-info
  17. Berg, R. D. (1996). The indigenous gastrointestinal microflora. Trends in Microbiology, 4(11), 430-435. Retrieved from https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/0966842X96100573
  18. Carpenter, S. (2012, September). That gut feeling. Monitor on Psychology, 43(8), 50. Retrieved from http://www.apa.org/monitor/2012/09/gut-feeling.aspx
  19. Clapp, M., Aurora, N., Herrera, L., Bhatia, M., Wilen, E., & Wakefield, S. (2017, September 15). Gut microbiota’s effect on mental health: The gut-brain axis. Clinics and Practice, 7(4), 987. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5641835/
  20. NIH Human Microbiome Project. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://hmpdacc.org/
  21. Shepherd, E. S., DeLoache, W. C., Pruss, K. M., Whitaker, W. R., & Sonnenburg, J. L. (2018, May 9). An exclusive metabolic niche enables strain engraftment in the gut microbiota [abstract]. Nature, 557, 434-438. Retrieved from https://www.nature.com/articles/s41586-018-0092-4
  22. The Human Microbiome Project Consortium. (2012, 14 June). Structure, function and diversity of the healthy human microbiome. Nature, 486, 207-214. Retrieved from https://www.nature.com/articles/nature11234
  23. Ursell, L. K., Metcalf, L., K., Wegener Parfry, L., Knight, R. (2012, August). Defining the human microbiome. Nutrition Reviews, 70(Suppl 1), S38-S44. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3426293/
question 2415069 1920

What Registered Practitioners Can and Cannot say on Social Media and Advertising

Dr Andrew Orr is often asked many questions while online in various social media platforms and often cannot respond the way people would like him to.
What many people do not realise is that Registered Healthcare practitioners are governed by strict laws around what they can, or cannot say on social media, or various forms of advertising. This also includes what they can, or cannot say on their websites too.

Dr Orr has a quick discussion around this so people realise why registered healthcare practitioners have to respond in certain ways, or why they cannot give advice when asked. I hope this helps everyone understand why.

Fertility Diet for website

Mediterranean Style Diet May Help to Improve Pregnancy Rates for Couples Undergoing IVF and Assisted Reproduction.

New research published in Human Reproduction, has found that those who follow a “Mediterranean” style diet at least six months before assisted reproductive treatment have a significantly better chance of becoming pregnant and giving birth to a live baby than women who did not.

As part of my Fertility Program, one of the first things I talk to couples about is the importance of a healthy diet that has adequate protein, lots of vegetables, seeds and nuts, healthy oils, adequate water intake, electrolytes and cutting out all the refined carbohydrates that cause inflammation.

The hard thing is that I hardly see a couple following those health food principles, with many not even really knowing what a health diet is. The diet that I promote is based on my specially formulated PACE diet.

Previous studies have shown that when refined carbohydrates are cut out and replaced with proteins, essential fats and good carbohydrates, such as fruit and vegetables, that the clinical pregnancy rates shot up by 80%. (Fertility & Sterility 2012 Volume 98 issues 3 Page S47)

In this new study, researchers focussed in dietary patterns rather than individual nutrients, food, or food groups. They found that those who ate lean protein, more fresh vegetables, fruit, fish and olive oil, had a 70% greater likelihood of achieving a successful pregnancy and birth compared to women who didn’t follow this style of diet.

The research outcomes found that out of the 244 women in the study, 229 women (93.9%) had at least one embryo transferred to their wombs; 138 (56%) had a successful implantation; 104 (42.6%) achieved a clinical pregnancy (one that can be confirmed by ultrasound); and 99 (40.5%) gave birth to a live baby.

The most important message to come from the study is that women attempting to have a baby should be encouraged to eat a healthy diet, such as a Mediterranean style diet, because it may help increase the chances of successful pregnancy and successful live birth.

The researchers did note that when it comes to conceiving a baby, diet and lifestyle are just as important for men as for women. Previous studies from the same research group showed that male partners that adhered to the same sort had better semen quality.

A healthy diet is important for all couples prior to trying to conceive and should be a part of any preconception planning by all healthcare practitioners assisting couples with fertility.

While this study focussed on improving assisted reproduction pregnancy rates, this style of diet should be adopted by any couple wanting to have a baby and should be implemented at least 6 months prior to conceiving. This is why it is essential for all couples to receive counselling and guidance on the importance of a healthy diet and having a healthy lifestyle as well.

This is a foundation of my fertility program that has helped over 12,500 babies into the world and continues to assist many more couples reach their goal of becoming parents. If you would like to find out more about my fertility program and how it may assist you, please give my friendly clinic staff a call to find out more.

Regards

Andrew Orr

-No Stone Left Unturned

-The International Fertility Experts

adult career clipboard 1919236 2

Asking the Right Questions about Period Pain & Gynaecological Issues.

All to often women have gynaecological disease states “missed” and “dismissed” because their healthcare practitioner was not asking the right questions about period pain and gynaecological issues.

I didn’t know how I was going to start this post, or begin to talk about what I am about to talk about, other than I got some inspiration after a text message, and a phone call later on,  from my eldest daughter some time ago.

I will talk about that soon. But let’s talk about some of the phone calls and messages I get from people every day and how some of these messages gives me a heads up into what may be going on for these people and then getting them in for a proper consult and the right help.

Every day I get phone calls, emails, Facebook messages etc, from women (young and older) who are experiencing period pain, menstrual issues, and other related symptoms and nearly all of them have the same story.

“I have been to the GP and I have had blood tests and scans and they say that there is nothing wrong”. This is what I hear all so often.

It happens so often and it is like there is a script written for these poor women who just want to get out of pain and get some sort of normal life back. I get so annoyed when I hear this repetitious line. Not at the people telling me, but knowing that these poor women really haven’t been investigated properly at all and probably won’t be unless they come and see me.

I remember I got a text that I really wasn’t expecting, as it was from my eldest daughter.

It read “Hey Dad, is endometriosis hereditary?”

To which I replied “Yes it can be, why?”

I anxiously awaited the next reply and thankfully she was asking on behalf of a friend. But this poor friend had been experiencing really bad period pain and had basically had blood tests and scans and been told that everything was normal.

Apparently one of the scans showed some fluid in the Pouch of Douglas (POD), which can actually be a sign of endometriosis and inflammation. Worse still, this poor girl’s mother actually has endometriosis and nobody is putting two and two together and asking the question “I wonder if the daughter may have it too?”

Well, there is more than a good chance that she does have it and thank goodness my daughter actually knows the signs and knows that scans and bloods tests cannot diagnose many gynaecological issues, especially endometriosis.

Lucky my daughter also knows that you need to see an advanced trained laparoscopic surgeon who specialises in the excision of endometriosis and has done years of extra surgical training to specialise in these disease states. The good thing is that she knows that you cannot just see a regular gynaecologist to get this done.

But, not everyone is as fortunate as my daughter to know this and help her friend to come and see me to help her see my surgeon and then I can help her with management of the disease, if found (which is highly likely) after the surgery.

The other good thing is that my daughter knows there is no cure for endometriosis and that surgery isn’t going to fix the problem either. She knows it will help, and is needed, but after the surgery, the management post surgery is the most important, for disease states like endometriosis.

Unfortunately not many people know this and don’t have the disease managed properly post surgery. Women with endometriosis and some other inflammatory gynaecological issues will need a team approach, or a multimodality approach  post surgery, because even with the best medical intervention, it really isn’t enough and why so many women have the disease and symptoms return, or may still be in pain and have other recurring symptoms.

There is never a one treatment, one pill, fix all approach to disease states such and endometriosis. This is where so many go wrong.

One of the main issues for women can be that they really have not seen the right healthcare professions, especially the right surgeon and unfortunately this is many of the women that have had surgical intervention. This one is so important.

Whenever I get messages from women in pain, or I consult with women who have period pain and all the other associated symptoms, there are some standard questions I ask, to know if they have been given the right information, been diagnosed properly, or seen the right surgeon.

  1. I always ask “what tests have you had done?” – I know that if they have only had blood tests and some scans, then these women have not been investigated, or diagnosed properly.
  2. Then I usually ask “Have you just seen your GP, or have you seen a specialist?”– Most of the time many women have not been referred onto a specialist and have only just been seen to by a GP. This is one of the biggest issues women face when it comes to gynaecological conditions. GP’s are just general practitioners. They are not gynaecologists and definitely not advanced trained laparoscopic surgeons. The best thing any woman can do is ask for a referral to a specialist and a good GP should know to do this anyway. This is one of the biggest reasons that women from all over the world take up to a decade to be diagnosed with disease states such as endometriosis. On a daily basis women are missed and dismissed and told there is nothing wrong, go on the pill, or that they have some inflammatory bowel condition, when in fact they have endometriosis, or adenomyosis, or some inflammatory gynaecological issue. Btw, this isn’t to put GP’s down, unfortunately this is what happens to so many women and why it often takes up to a decade for women to be diagnosed with diseases such as endometriosis. This is an unfortunate fact and it needs to change.
  3. Then I ask “Have you had a laparoscopy?”– One of the most common responses is “What is a laparoscopy?” and that way I know they haven’t had one done. A laparoscopy is the gold standard investigation of the pelvis and the only way to properly diagnose disease states and causes of period pain, such as endometriosis.
  4. If the woman has had surgery I then ask “was the surgery done publically, or privately?” – This will tell me a few things. It will let me know if it was just done be a public surgeon, who probably isn’t an advanced trained laparoscopic surgeon. The issue is that there really aren’t that many advanced trained laparoscopic surgeons that do public work, and even if you strike the jackpot and do happen to get one, there is a good chance they are only in a teaching role to instruct a trainee surgeon to do the surgery anyway. But mostly women do not get an advanced trained laparoscopic surgeon in the public system. It is sad, but true unfortunately. Many times the first surgery in the public sector is purely investigative too and no excision (disease removal) is performed. This means that the woman has to come back for further surgery, or surgeries.
  5. If they the woman has had surgery done previously by a private specialist then I usually ask “Who was the surgeon that did your investigation and surgical procedure?” – Sometimes I can ask if the surgeon was an advanced trained laparoscopic surgeon and the patient usually will respond to not knowing, or even know what I was talking about. That usually gives me a clue that it most probably wasn’t, but then I can go and check the specialists qualifications online and see if they are, or most probably aren’t, an advanced trained laparoscopic surgeon who has done years of extra specialised surgical training.

All those 5 questions can tell me much about what some of these poor women have had done, or haven’t had done, and then I can formulate an appropriate treatment plan and management for these women moving forward.

It is always hard explaining to the ones that have had surgery before that they haven’t seen the right surgeon and that they are going to need further surgery. The hardest thing for me is seeing women on support pages about to have their first surgery and I always worry that they aren’t seeing the right surgeon and if they don’t, there is a good chance that they are still going to be going through the same issues, over and over again, until they find the right person to help them.

If only I could see all these women before they did anything, so that they can be given the right information and the facts and be managed properly.

The good thing is that when I do get to see women who chose to see me, I can explain to them the facts and the right information and then why and how with a proper surgeon, that it can make a huge difference to how they are feeling and their recovery and management post surgery.

I can also explain how surgery really is necessary, but is only a small part of their overall treatment and management of their disease moving forward. I can also explain the facts around their disease moving forward too and make sure that women under my care are given the right information, the right investigations and right management going forward.

This is why my initial consultations take about an hour and a half and we go over everything from their health history, medical history, hereditary issues, diet, lifestyle, surgical intervention, medications, natural medicines, blood tests, scans, investigations, sleep, sexual health, libido and everything that a woman needs to know about her particular issues.

It is also about listening to a woman’s concerns and complaints and really hearing what she has to say and is experiencing.

Then I formulate a treatment plan and management and 20 page report of findings for them for what we are going to be doing to help them moving forward.

I also give them a step by step treatment plan of treatments and medicines etc they will need too. That is why my motto is “No Stone Left Unturned”, because there is no stone left unturned and I also make sure they see the right people (surgeons and anyone else that they may need to see).

If there are things that I can’t do (surgery etc), I make sure that my patients only see the best people, in my trusted network,  and then I can help manage their disease state alongside other specialists and medical interventions.

I wish I could see every woman before they went for any investigation, or surgery, so I can point them in the right direction and help them manage their gynaecological condition properly.

This is why I am so passionate about doing my posts on social media, or giving time for charity events to talk about women’s health issues and gynaecological issues such as endometriosis, adenomyosis and PCOS.

It is why I do healthcare practitioner education and seminars to help educate them better too, so that they can help their patients better and not miss and dismiss them.

I just hope that I can help those who have not been heard and that have been missed and dismissed. I also hope we can get people to listen to the things I have presented above and also help women get a voice, be heard and get government listening and get more education to younger women too.

Lastly, I cannot say it often enough….. Period Pain “IS NOT” normal and if you, or your daughter, or your sister, or your mother, or cousin, your best friend, or anyone you know has period pain, especially bad period pain and other symptoms, please, please, do not tell them that this is normal.

Period Pain is not normal and women who are experiencing period pain need to see someone who specialises in women’s health and gynaecological conditions, so that they can be investigated properly and have their issues managed properly too.

If you do need assistance with a women’s health issue, you can make a booking to have a consultation with me. Please call my friendly staff to find out more.

Regards

Andrew Orr

-No Stone Left Unturned

-Women’s and Men’s Health Care Advocate

-The Endometriosis Experts

-The Women’s Health Experts

pregnancy 1966493 1920

No Bad Carbs + Increased Protein = Increased Fertility & Increased Pregnancy rates

I know I talk about it all the time, but a good diet, and I mean a good diet (not half hearted, I am trying to do it diet), can actually assist with increased fertility and pregnancy rates

Every day I get people ask me “What can I do to increase my fertility and my chances of pregnancy?”

Well, I always say “How long is a piece of string?”

While there are many things that people can do to increase their chances of a pregnancy, one important thing is starting with a good diet. That is one thing “You” are solely responsible for and something can do for yourself. This is for the couple too. Not just the woman.

Healthy couples produce healthy babies. That means health men produce healthy sperm and healthy women produce healthy eggs and the combination creates healthy embryos that go on to become healthy babies. It really is a fact. Even for same sex couples, a partner should be supporting their other half in the journey and at the end of the day a healthy diet is going to help everyone live longer to enjoy their children later on, and hopefully grandchildren too.

Obviously there is a lot more to it, and why in my fertility program I cover “everything” for the couple,  but this is one way to ensure your body is ready to have a baby. This is also part of my PACE (Primal, Ancestral, Clean Eating) diet that I have formulated.

Recent studies have shown that when the bad carbohydrates (see below) are removed and the protein increased, that the clinic pregnancy rates shot up by 80%. Yes… a massive 80%

Let me explain what bad carbs are. They are:
Refined grains, refined sugars, refined flour products, breads (gluten free included), pastries, heavily processed foods etc. Anything highly refined and man made and highly processed.

Good carbs are the following:
Fresh fruits, fresh vegetables, fresh salads, sweet potato etc,  and basically any carbohydrate that is not highly processed and man made.

Decreasing bad carbs and increasing protein increases embryo quality

The other thing that is important is that eating this way also improved the embryo quality. Blastocyst development was higher in the high-protein group than in the low-protein group (64% vs 33.8%), as were clinical pregnancy rates (66.6% vs 31.9%) and live birth rates (58.3% vs 11.3%). (1)

Reducing carbohydrates and boosting protein intake can significantly improve a woman’s and couples chance of conception and birth according to the research presented at the American Society of Reproductive Medicine (ASRM) several years ago.

The effect is “at the egg level,” said lead investigator. He presented the findings here at American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists 61st Annual Clinical Meeting.

Refined Carbohydrate-loaded diets create a hostile egg and embryo environment even before conception or implantation, he explained.

“Eggs and embryos are not going to do well in a high-glucose environment.” By lowering carbs and increasing protein, “you’re bathing your egg in good, healthy, nutritious supplements,” he said.

These studies demonstrate how little many in the reproductive medicine and fertility profession know about the effect of micronutrients in our diets on various aspects of reproduction.

These studies demonstrate a field wide open for future research and shows how bad carbohydrates (refined grains, refined sugars etc) have an inflammatory effect that affects fertility and pregnancy outcomes and also detrimental to IVF outcomes.

This is why I always promote a grain free, primal based diet (PACE Diet) to all of my patients, especially my fertility and gynaecology patients. It is an essential part of my fertility program. If you do want to find out more about my fertility program, please give my friendly staff a call.

Regards

Andrew Orr

-No Stone Left Unturned

-Women’s and Men’s Health Advocate

-The International Fertility Experts

References

  1. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.fertnstert.2012.07.849
aroma art beverage 1251175

Coffee Reduces Liver Disease & Helps You Live Longer

Coffee is one of the most popular drinks on the planet and many of us wake each day to go and drink a cup, or two to get us going on our day.

Coffee is always one of the things that many people can see as a bad thing and is often the first thing they cut out when going on a supposed health kick.

Interestingly coffee is often cut out long before alcohol is and this often tells us where peoples mind sets are engrained. Regardless, there have been numerous studies to show the benefits of coffer and its use in the prevention of many disease states and even certain cancers.

The good news is that a newly published studies show that it may reduce the risk of liver disease by 70 percent. This is not the first time coffee has been shown to have a beneficial effect on the liver. Recent research has shown that a few cups of coffee per day can actually prolong your life.

Interesting Facts About Coffee

It is interesting that in Chinese medicine, they believe that bitter herbs and bitter tasting foods can actually help the liver. This has been known for thousands of years. Guess what property coffee’s taste is? Yep, you guessed it…. Bitter. So the Chinese medicine doctors of old knew many things long before modern research.

Liver disease is a silent killer and many people do not know they have it until it is too late. Liver disease kills millions of people each year around the world and much of the problems gets back to alcohol and a diet high in refined sugars, refined grains and highly processed refined carbohydrates. Too many refined carbohydrates and sugars cause the body to store fats and stop the burning of fats and then we store those fats and people end up with heart disease and fatty liver disease.

The good thing is that if you cut out all those bad refined carbohydrates, eat a healthier diet, cut back the alcohol, do some daily exercise and have a couple of cups of coffee per day, then your risk of liver disease, and heart disease, drops dramatically. There could be a reduction of up to 70% for those that adopt these practices.

Next time you think about ditching the coffee for your next health kick, you may want to stop and think about that just a little bit more. Coffee is known to have many vitamins, minerals and amino acids. It also has other properties as well. But this is from good coffee bean, not instant coffee, which is full of preservatives, dyes and colours.

If you truly want to go on a health kick, or detox,  ditch the bad carbohydrates, the sugars and the alcohol and keep the coffee instead. Your liver will thank you for it.

Regards

Andrew Orr

Women’s and Men’s Health Advocate

-No Stone Left Unturned

References

1.Kennedy OJ, Roderick P, Buchanan R, Fallowfield JA, Hayes PC, Parkes J. Systematic review with meta-analysis: coffee consumption and the risk of cirrhosis. Aliment Pharmacol Ther2016;359:56274doi:10.1111/apt.13523 pmid:26806124.

2.BMJ 2017359 doi: https://doi.org/10.1136/bmj.j5024 (Published 22 November 2017)Cite this as: BMJ 2017;359:j5024

adults alcohol alcoholic beverage 1304473

Alcohol Decreases Fertility & Makes Gynaecological Conditions Worse

In today’s modern society, alcohol has become the cornerstone for social engagements, business dinners and after work relaxation. It is important to realise however, that alcohol can directly impact the fertility of both males and females.

In males it can decrease sperm quality, reduce testicular size, decrease libido and cause impotence, all of which can impair fertility.

In females it has a more systemic response, affecting the reproductive hormones, leading to abnormalities in the menstrual cycle and an increased risk of miscarriage.

Many men and women these days are actually consuming copious amounts of alcohol and may think that their drinking habits are normal, when compared to others around them.

When people do things on a regular basis, it becomes their normal. But truth be told, many people’s drinking habits, both men and women, are actually in the realms of alcoholism. The impacts of that are far reaching and fertility and gynaecological conditions are definitely impacted by alcohol consumption.

Effect of Alcohol on Conception for Men

Fecundability refers to the probability of conception during a particular menstrual cycle. It is dependent on the reproductive potential of both partners. Alcohol decreases fecundability by its effect on sperm quality and quantity. Men who continue to consume alcohol on a regular basis, can decrease their sperm motility, morphology and their DNA in the sperm. All of which are important factors in achieving fertility.

While outwardly a man’s sperm may look OK, many forget that inwardly, the sperm DNA could be highly fragmented and unless this is tested every ejaculation, you will have no idea how bad the sperm actually is. A one off DNA fragmentation analysis does not mean the sperm each time is OK. It only measures the sperm from the ejaculate that was tested and sperm quality can change by as much as 20% each ejaculation.

Testicular size is also affected by alcohol intake; and can also affect sperm production. Alcohol is a depressant of the central nervous system (CNS), and can disrupt the autonomic system of the CNS. These effects are temporary and short lived. Abnormal sperm production is also temporary and also can resume after abstaining from alcohol.

One study, this one looking at couples going through IVF treatment, found that for every additional drink a man consumed per day, the risk of conception not leading to a live birth increased by 2 to 8 times. This was especially true if the drinking occurred within a month of the IVF treatment.

Effect of Alcohol on Conception for Women

In women, alcohol affects fecundability, by disrupting the delicate balance of the menstrual cycle. Clinical research data published in the “British Medical Journal” suggests that women, who drank socially, 1-5 drinks per week, were at a greater risk of decreased fecundability when compared to women who remained abstinent. These findings underscore the importance of remaining abstinent while attempting to conceive.

Alcohol disrupts the hormonal imbalance of the female reproductive system, leading to menstrual irregularities, and even Anovulatory cycles, (menstrual cycles where ovulation fails to occur). Menstrual pain can directly be linked to the amount of alcohol consumed in the lead up to the menses and consumptions of alcohol, even small amounts, exacerbates most gynaecological conditions. These changes can drastically decrease a woman’s chance of becoming pregnant and thus affect fertility.

Alcohol effects fertility in both partners, and can do so in so many ways. For couples who desire to have a baby, it is best to stay away from drinking completely. Presently there is no safe limit of alcohol intake; even socially acceptable amounts of alcohol can affect fertility potential and outcomes.

Moderate drinking (1-2 drinks in one sitting) is probably okay, especially if you reserve those drinks to a few times a week, instead of daily. However, if you’re going through IVF treatment, or trying to conceive naturally, you might consider cutting out alcohol for the time being.

A woman that is trying to concieve, or trying to improve a gynaecological issues, or menstrual issues, should not be consuming more than 4 standard drinks per week.

A male who is trying to conceive, or have sperm quality issues, should have no more than 2 standard drinks in one sitting and be having at least 2 alcohol free days per week. These are all part of the healthy drinking set out in health department and government safe drinking guidelines.

Trying to conceive is a special time in a couple’s life, it should be filled with love, devotion and safe health practices, which means a healthy diet and lifestyle and having a healthy mind too. It also means having healthy drinking habits as well.

Decreasing alcohol, having bete foods and looking at a healthy detoxification program is also a great idea for those trying to increase their fertility and get their reproductive systems working better. Healthy eggs and health sperm make healthy babies. Healthy reproductive systems also mean better menstrual cycles and better testicular health too.

Safe drinking everyone. This is something I talk about as part of my fertility program and preconception care. If you would like to find out more about my fertility program, please contact my friendly staff to find out more.

Regards

Andrew Orr

-Women’s and Men’s Health Advocate

– No Stone Left Unturned

-The International Fertility Experts

couple in love

Sex Around The Time of Embryo Transfer Increases The Likelihood of Successful Early Embryo Implantation and Development.

One of the things that I  promote is that regular sex is so important for our fertility patients, on so many levels. Sometimes the obvious eludes some people though.

One of the things I see quite regularly is that couples doing Assisted Reproduction (ART) are abstaining from sex fearing it will affect their chances of conceiving. Actually the opposite is true. By not having sex during ART cycles (IUI, IVF etc) you are affecting your chances of conception.

I have often spoken about the importance of sex and orgasm assisting implantation in other posts and there is so much medical research to back this up

Let me ask the question “If you were trying naturally, would you stop having sex for fear that conception has taken place?”

Then why would you stop having sex around an ART cycle?

Let’s face the facts, implantation takes place in the uterus, and not the vagina, and no man is that well endowed to even penetrate the cervix, so…. Let’s get a grip here

The question to ask is “What does an embryo feed off and need to successfully implant?”

The answer is blood!

Think of a tick borrowing into skin to feed off its host.

How do you get blood flow into the uterine lining?

The answer is that sex and climax stimulate blood flow to the lining to assist implantation and also prepare the lining for implantation!

Nature has given us all the tools for healthy conception to take place, and yet many of us just aren’t using them.

This article shows that sperm are also beneficial in assisting implantation and exposure to semen around the time of embryo transfer increases the likelihood of successful early embryo implantation and development.

http://humrep.oxfordjournals.org/content/15/12/2653.full

Don’t forget that regular sex during this time not only helps assist implantation, but it also helps with the bonding process and physical connection process during this stressful time. Many couples split up because of losing this connection during the ART process and sex is a way of keeping that physical and emotional connection. Sex also tells your body you are also preparing to conceive on another level too.

For those doing IVF etc, next time you are doing an ART cycle maybe it is time to start doing things the way nature intended to give you that boost you so desperately are needing. Time to go and get busy people.

All of this, and more, is discussed as part of my Fertility Program. If you would like to find out more, please give my friendly staff a call and they will explain the Fertility Program to you.

Regards

Andrew Orr

– No Stone Left Unturned

-Women’s and Men’s Health Advocate

-The International Fertility Experts

Thyroid

Could your health issues be coming from your Thyroid?

Thyroid issues are common, especially in women and especially if there is a family history of thyroid disorders in your family. When your thyroid goes out of balance, it can cause all sorts of symptoms and issues in your body. You need to know what to look for.

When Your Thyroid Goes Awry

Does fatigue drag you down day after day?

Do you have brain fog, weight gain, chills, or hair loss?

Or is the opposite true for you: Are you often revved up, sweaty, or anxious?

Your thyroid gland could be to blame. This great regulator of body and mind sometimes goes haywire, particularly in women. Pregnancy and postpartum is when it can also go haywire too. Getting the right treatment is critical to feel your best and avoid serious health problems.

What Is the Thyroid Gland?

The thyroid is a butterfly-shaped gland in the front of the neck. It produces hormones that control the speed of your metabolism — the system that helps the body use energy. Thyroid disorders can slow down or rev up metabolism by disrupting the production of thyroid hormones. When hormone levels become too low or too high, you may experience a wide range of symptoms.

Symptom: Weight Gain or Loss

An unexplained change in weight is one of the most common signs of a thyroid disorder. Weight gain may signal low levels of thyroid hormones, a condition called hypothyroidism. In contrast, if the thyroid produces more hormones than the body needs, you may lose weight unexpectedly. This is known as hyperthyroidism. Hypothyroidism is far more common.

Symptom: Swelling in the Neck

A swelling or enlargement in the neck is a visible clue that something may be wrong with the thyroid. A goiter may occur with either hypothyroidism or hyperthyroidism. Sometimes swelling in the neck can result from thyroid cancer or nodules, lumps that grow inside the thyroid. It can also be due to a cause unrelated to the thyroid.

Symptom: Changes in Heart Rate

Thyroid hormones affect nearly every organ in the body and can influence how quickly the heart beats. People with hypothyroidism may notice their heart rate is slower than usual. Hyperthyroidism may cause the heart to speed up. It can also trigger increased blood pressure and the sensation of a pounding heart, or other types of heart palpitations.

Symptom: Changes in Energy or Mood

Thyroid disorders can have a noticeable impact on your energy level and mood. Hypothyroidism tends to make people feel tired, sluggish, and depressed. Hyperthyroidism can cause anxiety, problems sleeping, restlessness, and irritability.

Symptom: Hair Loss

Hair loss is another sign that thyroid hormones may be out of balance. Both hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism can cause hair to fall out. In most cases, the hair will grow back once the thyroid disorder is treated.

Symptom: Feeling Too Cold or Hot

Thyroid disorders can disrupt the ability to regulate body temperature. People with hypothyroidism may feel cold more often than usual. Hyperthyroidism tends to have the opposite effect, causing excessive sweating and an aversion to heat.

Other Symptoms of Hypothyroidism

Hypothyroidism can cause many other symptoms, including:

  • Dry skin and brittle nails
  • Numbness or tingling in the hands
  • Constipation
  • Abnormal menstrual periods

Other Symptoms of Hyperthyroidism

Hyperthyroidism can also cause additional symptoms, such as:

  • Muscle weakness or trembling hands
  • Vision problems
  • Diarrhea
  • Irregular menstrual periods

Thyroid Disorder or Menopause?

Because thyroid disorders can cause changes in menstrual cycle and mood, the symptoms are sometimes mistaken for menopause. If a thyroid problem is suspected, a simple blood test can determine whether the true culprit is menopause or a thyroid disorder — or a combination of the two.

Who Should Be Tested?

If you think you have symptoms of a thyroid problem, ask your doctor if you should be tested. People with symptoms or risk factors may need tests more often. Hypothyroidism more frequently affects women over age 60. Hyperthyroidism is also more common in women. A family history raises your risk of either disorder.

Thyroid Neck Check

A careful look in the mirror may help you spot an enlarged thyroid that needs a doctor’s attention. Tip your head back, take a drink of water, and as you swallow, examine your neck below the Adam’s apple and above the collarbone. Look for bulges or protrusions, then repeat the process a few times. See a doctor promptly if you see a bulge or lump.

Diagnosing Thyroid Disorders

If your doctor suspects a thyroid disorder, a blood test can help provide an answer. This test measures the level of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), a kind of master hormone that regulates the work of the thyroid gland. If TSH is high, it typically means that your thyroid function is too low (hypothyroid). If TSH is low, then it generally means the thyroid is overactive (hyperthyroid.) But just measuring TSH levels is not enough. People with thyroid disorders can have normal TSH levels and the other thyroid hormone levels and this is why thyroid antibody testing is probably the most important testing to be done. High thyroid antibodies mean you have a thyroid condition and your thyroid gland is under attack. Hopefully doctor will want to check all the other thyroid hormones in your blood. If he/she doesn’t, make sure they do. They should always check TSH, Free T3, Free T4, Reverse T3 and Thyroid antibodies. In some cases, imaging studies are used and biopsies are taken to evaluate a thyroid abnormality.

Hashimoto’s Disease

The most common cause of hypothyroidism is Hashimoto’s disease. This is an autoimmune disorder in which the body attacks the thyroid gland. The result is damage to the thyroid, preventing it from producing enough hormones. Hashimoto’s disease tends to run in families. This is why thyroid antibodies needs to be checked because people with Hashimotos disease can actually have normal TSH levels and normal Free T3, Free T4 and reverse T3 levels.

Other Causes of Hypothyroidism

In some cases, hypothyroidism results from a problem with the pituitary gland, which is at the base of the brain. This gland produces thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), which tells the thyroid to do its job. If your pituitary gland does not produce enough TSH, levels of thyroid hormones will fall. Other causes of hypothyroidism include temporary inflammation of the thyroid or medications that affect thyroid function.

Graves’ Disease

The most common cause of hyperthyroidism is Graves’ disease. This is an autoimmune disorder that attacks the thyroid gland and triggers the release of high levels of thyroid hormones. One of the hallmarks of Graves’ disease is a visible and uncomfortable swelling behind the eyes. Again this is why testing thyroid antibodies is so important.

Other Causes of Hyperthyroidism

Hyperthyroidism can also result from thyroid nodules. These are lumps that develop inside the thyroid and sometimes begin producing thyroid hormones. Large lumps may create a noticeable goiter. Smaller lumps can be detected with ultrasound. A thyroid uptake and scan can tell if the lump is producing too much thyroid hormone.

Thyroid Disorder Complications

When left untreated, hypothyroidism can raise cholesterol levels and make you more likely to have a stroke or heart attack. In severe cases, very low levels of thyroid hormones can trigger a loss of consciousness and life-threatening drop in body temperature. Untreated hyperthyroidism can cause serious heart problems and brittle bones.

Treating Hypothyroidism

If you are diagnosed with hypothyroidism, your doctor will most likely prescribe thyroid hormones in the form of a pill. This usually leads to noticeable improvements within a couple of weeks. Long-term treatment can result in more energy, lower cholesterol levels, and gradual weight loss. Most people with hypothyroidism will need to take thyroid hormones for the rest of their lives.

Treating Hyperthyroidism

The most common treatment for hyperthyroidism is antithyroid medication, which aims to lower the amount of hormones produced by the thyroid. The condition may eventually go away, but many people need to remain on medication for the long term. Other drugs may be given to reduce symptoms such as rapid pulse and tremors. Another option is radioactive iodine, which destroys the thyroid gland over the course of 6 to 18 weeks. Once the gland is destroyed, or removed by surgery, most patients must begin taking thyroid hormones in pill form.

Surgery for Thyroid Disorders

Removing the thyroid gland can cure hyperthyroidism, but the procedure is only recommended if antithyroid drugs don’t work, or if there is a large goiter. Surgery may also be recommended for patients with thyroid nodules. Once the thyroid is removed, most patients require daily supplements of thyroid hormones to avoid developing hypothyroidism.

What About Thyroid Cancer?

Thyroid cancer is uncommon and is among the least deadly. The good thing with thyroid cancer is that it is encapsulated, so it won’t spread. Once the thyroid gland is removed, the cancer is removed also. The main symptom is a lump or swelling in the neck, and only about 5% of thyroid nodules turn out to be cancerous. When thyroid cancer is diagnosed, it is most often treated with surgery followed by radioactive iodine therapy or, in some cases, external radiation therapy

Complementary Medicine For Thyroid Issues

There are complementary medicines that may assist thyroid issues and it is important that you have a consultation and talk to a qualified healthcare practitioner about these options.

There are also supplements and other herbal medicine that may assist thyroid function, or balancing the thyroid hormones.

Diet and lifestyle changes are also very important for thyroid health, as is working on the gut and microbiome to reduce inflammation in the body and assist the immune system as well. There are also compounded natural thyroid medications that may assist thyroid issues as well.

Please make sure you see your healthcare practitioner, or endocrinologist for help with thyroid issues and ongoing management and never try to manage things on your own.

If you need assistance with thyroid management and management of other hormonal issues, please call my friendly clinic staff and they will be able to book you in for a consultation and explain more.

Regards

Andrew Orr

-Women’s and Men’s Health Advocate

-No Stone Left Unturned

01 Dr Andrew Orr 1