IBS

Managing Irritable Bowel Syndrome & Inflammatory Bowel Disease

Irritable Bowel Syndrome, or IBS, is a problem that affects a staggering 3million people, or more, in Australia and about 20% of people world-wide. It is a condition that has baffled doctors for years. There is no single cause, no specific treatment and, as yet, no cure.

But first let’s look at some general information on IBS.

IBS is more common in women than in men and occurs more often in younger people. IBS is usually ongoing, and there are some times when symptoms are worse than other times. Having IBS does not mean you are more likely to develop colon cancer later in life.

Symptoms of IBS

Some people with IBS mainly have constipation, others have diarrhoea. Many people with IBS alternate between periods of constipation and diarrhoea.

Symptoms include:

  • Cramps and bloating in your lower abdomen, which usually get better after having a bowel motion or passing wind
  • Pain that can be a sharp or dull feeling
  • Constipation: feeling that you have not managed to empty your bowels completely, having bowel motions less often, straining to pass a motion or passing small, hard stools
  • Diarrhoea: having bowel motions too often and passing loose stools
  • Flatulence, or wind, and/or rumbling noises from your abdomen
  • Needing to rush to the toilet
  • Headaches
  • Mucus in your stools

Some of these symptoms can also be from other inflammatory bowel diseases such as Crohns disease and Ulcerative Colitis, which sometimes get categories as IBS.

But some of the symptoms above can also be part of having endometriosis and many women who are diagnosis with IBS, in fact have endometriosis. They then have all the testing for IBS, Crohn’s, ulcerative colitis etc (colonoscopy etc) as these don’t find anything and then these women are often told by doctors they are at a loss to what is happening. This is why endometriosis often takes up to 12 years for definitive diagnosis, which is terrible.

IBS triggers

The cause of IBS is not known, but certain things can trigger its symptoms, including:

  • Stress
  • Depressed mood
  • Food poisoning
  • Tummy bug
  • Virus
  • Certain foods and drinks
  • Some medication
  • Some people find avoiding alcohol, caffeine and nicotine can reduce their IBS symptoms

As said before some women suffer more acutely from symptoms of IBS just before, or during, their menstrual cycle. IBS symptoms can also mean that they have a condition called Endometriosis. Many times these conditions can be overlooked and they can be present at the same time, along with bladder issues as well.

Lactose and wheat intolerance and wheat may be a cause and needs to be assessed before permanent changes to diet are made. Wheat grains are inflammatory to the bowel anyway and they should be removed if anyone does have inflammatory bowel issues.

Treatments

There are a few medical treatments available but results can be varying. Many people with severe IBS end up on steroids to settle inflammation in the bowel. There are also other medications to slow bowel motility and reduce inflammation as well.

Dietary and lifestyle changes are a must for the treatment of IBS. See my post on what real nutrition should be food what a good diet should be like.

There is, however complementary therapies that can bring great results.

The complementary medicine unit and the University of Western Sydney ran a randomised, double blind, placebo controlled trial to determine whether Chinese Herbal medicine was of any benefit in the treatment of IBS. Chinese medicine has been used for thousands of years to treat many disease states, including inflammatory bowel conditions.

The results were stunning. More than 70% of patients taking the Chinese herbs improved. The results were published in the Journal of the American Medicine Association.

There are also other complementary therapies and treatments that can be used and combined with medical interventions, or other interventions mentioned above.

Studies have shown that strain specific probiotic bacteria have induced remission in inflammatory bowel conditions such as ulcerative colitis and IBS. But, this needs consultation with a qualified healthcare professional to treat disease properly. Self-prescribing is not an option for this disease that affects over 3 million people here in Australia alone.

With any disease state such as IBS, there needs to be an individualised approach, not a one treatment fix all approach, because everyone is uniquely difference in their symptoms they experience and what their triggers are. There also needs to be a multimodality approach because many times IBS overlaps with conditions such as endometriosis for women, and other inflammatory conditions in men.

If you have IBS or inflammatory bowel disease and need help and assistance in managing your disease better, please give my friendly staff a call and they will explain how I may be able to assist you.

Regards

Andrew Orr

-No Stone Left Unturned

-Women’s and Men’s Health Advocate

References

  1. Treatment of IBs with chinese herbal medicine -Alan Bensoussan, MSc; Nick J. Talley, MD; Michael Hing, MBBS, FRACP; Robert Menzies, PhD; Anna Guo, PhD; Meng Ngu, PhD http://jama.jamanetwork.com/article.aspx?articleid=188145
  2. VSL#3 Probiotic-Mixture Induces Remission in Patients with Active Ulcerative Colitis- (American Journal of Gastroenterology 2005;100:1-8)
  3. Investigations and treatment of Endometriosis- Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists 2008
  4. Bensoussan A, Myers SP. Towards a Safer Choice: The Practice of Traditional Chinese Medicine in Australia . Sydney, Australia: University of Western Sydney Macarthur; 1996.
  1. Yu ZX, Wang K, Li FP. Clinical trial of Chinese herbal capsule for 157 cases of irritable bowel syndrome. Chin J Integrated Tradit West Med.1991;11:170-171.
  1. Liu ZK. Chinese herbal medicine treatment for 120 cases of irritable bowel syndrome. Chin J Integrated Tradit West Med.1990;10:615.
  1. Shi ZQ. Combination treatment of Chinese and Western medicine for 30 cases of irritable bowel syndrome. Chin J Integrated Tradit West Med.1989;9:241.
  2. Chen DZ. Tong Xie Yao Fang with additions in treating 106 cases of irritable bowel syndrome. Nanjing Med University J.1995;15:924.
  3. Xu RL. Clinical realisations during the diagnosis and treatment of 55 cases of irritable bowel syndrome. Shanxi J Tradit Chin Med.1995;11:10-11.

Don’t Wait Too Long To Get Help

In this post I am trying to highlight the importance of not waiting too long to get help, when it comes to pain, or any health condition.

Many people, myself included, with long term pain, chronic health conditions, often have higher than normal pain tolerance and can often leave things too long before seeking professional help. The problem is that the long a health condition is left, the longer pain is left, the harder it can be to treat, or manage on a clinical level.

I know I have spoken about this previously on many posts and why I am very passionate about early intervention for any health condition, especially pain.

During the last couple of weeks I have heard of people leaving things too long and actually ending up dead because of it. Just today, I have had two patients diagnosed with cancer, after leaving symptoms too long before seeking help. It just hits home the importance of seeking help early for any health issue we all face.

Have a listen to my latest post as to why we should not wait too long to get help.

Stress, Distress and De-Stress

Knowing the difference between stress, distress and de-stress.
Many people do not realise that being constantly busy and being stressed slowly creeps up on them and can one day cause major health issues for them. Being busy for for the sake of being busy is a very common issue these days. We actually refer to it as “The Disease of Being Busy”.

Too many people run their lives and their social status around this term. It is not a badge to be worn with pride at all. When people say that they don’t know how to slow down and relax, this isn’t good. They actually need to learn and retrain the body how to relax and what it feels like to relax.

Being too “Busy” causes stress on the body and can lead to disease, or exacerbate diseases that are already there. It also makes pain worse too.

Life is too short to be busy all the time and just being busy being busy. There is always time in a 24 hour day to take at least 1 hour for self. It is OK to leave emails, leave the washing etc and just be.

At my clinic I help people with learning how to relax and also giving ones body time out with many different forms of treatments. I also work in with counsellors, psychologists, and mindfulness practitioners,  who can teach people coping skills of how to slow down and enjoy life more.

Life is not a race and it is important that we teach children that being too busy is not OK either. It is OK to say “No” to everyone and just take time for self.

Stress and distress can not only cause physical symptoms, such as pain, but it can also cause emotional and psychological issues too. Stress can also kill you.

Symptoms of stress can accumulate over a long period of time and then present with acute symptoms, which can then become chronic. This is why I talk about learning to put yourself first and put your oxygen mask on before attending to others.

It is important to be aware of stress levels and also learning coping strategies and learning that being busy for the sake of being busy, may one day catch up with you and slow you down for good.

Have a listen to my latest video post about stress, distress and de-stress.

Regards

Dr Andrew Orr

-No Stone Left Unturned

-Women’s and Men’s Health Advocate.

doctor and patient

Finding Common Ground To Work With a Good Healthcare Practitioner

Finding a good healthcare practitioner can be hard. Many have already been jaded and been missed and dismissed by many. This then sets up the expectation that everyone you see, is going to be the same as the last.

The reality is that there are good practitioners out there and it is about finding some common ground, letting go of the past and moving forward with someone who really does want to help you.

Just be careful not to let the past experience with not so good healthcare practitioners be bought in with you when seeing a new healthcare practitioner. It can often then lead to more angst and boundaries and then leading to a good practitioner not being able to really help you.

I hope people can see the point I am trying to get at here. Not all healthcare practitioners are bad. Some are actually amazing and could really help you get your life back to normal again.

It is about working together for your greater health and to do that, there must be understanding on both parts. It is an individualised team approach.

Have a look at my video (below) on this issue.

Take care

Regards

Dr Andrew Orr

-No Stone Left Unturned

-Women’s and Men’s Health Advocate

-The Women’s Health Experts

anxiety black and white casual 1487956

Anxiety and Chronic Pain and Chronic Conditions

Chronic pain and chronic illness can be debilitating. Both pain and chronic conditions can go hand in hand and both can interfere in the daily function in life.

While chronic disease state can cause pain, many do not realise that there are also other factors that exacerbate chronic disease and chronic pain.

Diet, alcohol, drugs, cigarettes, additives in food, chemicals, environment, and emotions can all exacerbate and flare chronic disease state and pain. But some of these things people do not correlate to being part of their daily struggles and increased levels of pain.

Anxiety and depression are two of the things that can exacerbate pain and also lead to chronic pain pathologies. For this post I am going to focus of anxiety because I see so many people who have it. Many people do not realise that they actually have anxiety.

Many people also ignore the signs of anxiety and fob it off as not being able to switch off, or they think too much, or they just do not know how to slow down and relax. Many just fob it off saying that they are busy and don’t have time to stop. They are basically busy being busy. But is it really all those things they think they are?

What is anxiety?

Anxiety is a normal emotion and almost everyone has experienced anxiety at some point.  It is the emotion that people have when something dangerous might happen. Anxiety is closely related to fear. Fear occurs when something dangerous is happening. Anxiety can also activate that fight or flight response and get one adrenalin activated and running through ones veins. Adrenalin is activated to help us get away from danger. The problem with anxiety, danger isn’t really happening. It is the perception of something that may happen. None the less, the body prepares for danger and the nervous system goes into hyperdrive and the fight or flight response is activated.

As mentioned before, anxiety can also be when something dangerous is seemed to be pending, or hasn’t happened yet, though we perceive it could.  This is why people with anxiety always tend to be nervous. They are nervous in their feelings, their body and their behaviours as well. These people are quite literally waiting for the possibility of something dangerous to happen, or needing to get up and get moving. They literally cannot sit still.

Anxiety can also be divided into different aspects: feelings, physical manifestations, thinking, and behaviours.

Feelings

A number of feelings are associated with anxiety. It can cause one to feel apprehensive, feel alarmed, feel tension, feel nervousness, feel doubtful and also make one feel out of control.

Physical manifestations

Anxiety can also lead to physical manifestation in the body as well. It can cause muscle tension, increased hear rate, palpitations, increased blood pressure, heaviness in the chest, gastrointestinal upset and urgency, cold hands and feet, increased sweating, dizziness and increased energy and even cause the body to shake.

Thinking

Anxiety can also influence the way we think. It can cause increased worry, increase focus on things that have not occurred, increased focus on possible danger and all of the consequences that could occur, increased thinking of the worst case scenarios of what could happen to one self and anxiety can also cause increased thinking and overthinking in general.

Behaviours

Anxiety can also influence the way be behave.  It can cause restlessness, avoidance of activities ( for fear of perceived danger), cause nervousness, inability to sit still, need to get up and move all the time, and cause difficulty in completing things.

Sometimes, anxiety becomes persistent and then can get in the way of day-to-day life. When anxiety is persistent and interfering in day-to-day life, it’s considered no longer normal. It is then considered a disorder.

Anxiety and pain

Everyone experiences pain at some point in their life, but for those with anxiety and depression, pain can become intense and very hard to treat.

Anxiety is now known to be one the most common conditions that accompanies chronic pain. Anxiety tends to go hand in hand with chronic pain, because pain is a danger signal.  When we get pain it is to signal danger that something is wrong in the body and requires attention.  Pain then sets of the warning system that then leads the nervous system to respond. This then often leads to that fight or flight response talked about previously.

The nervous system’s response to pain just in the same way it responds to danger. This can be in the following ways:

  • Feelings of alarm, apprehension and distress
  • Increased reactivity of the body, such as
  • Increased muscle tension,
  • Increased heart rate ad blood pressure,
  • Gastrointestinal reactivity and digestive pain and upset
  • Increased cognitive focus on the pain, and then a tendency to worry and catastrophize about it
  • Avoidance behaviours, such as guarding, resting, staying home and not engaging in activities that might bring about or increase pain

In acute pain, these responses might be quite helpful. These feelings of pain and fear allow someone to seek help in order to prevent further injury.

In chronic pain, these feelings become anxiety and avoidance behaviours. When someone has chronic pain for a long time, the anxiety and avoidance behaviours can become chronic. The chronic anxiety leads to a chronic sense of alarm or distress, which makes patients nervous and can’t sit still and finds it very hard to relax and recover.

Anxiety and chronic pain

Chronic pain also affects the brain and thought patterns and it can lead to a chronic focus on pain, which pre-occupies the attention of the pain sufferer. Everyday decisions seem to turn on how much pain the patient has at any given time. It also leads to then nervous system to become over reactive. This can then lead to chronic muscle tension, which can switch pain pathways on more and this then leads to more pain. Chronic avoidance behaviours can then lead to an increasing sense of social isolation, inactivity, muscles loss and then not being able to cope or function physically and mentally. Daily life literally can become an effort and the person actually become disabled.

When the body reaches this state the nervous system has become stuck in the vicious cycle of constant reactivity. Pain pathways become more reactive and harder to switch off and pain levels can become very hard to manage. This state of reactivity is associated with a condition called central sensitization. This is where acute pain has becomes chronic and then this goes hand in hand with anxiety and other mood disorders.

Anxiety can present differently in each person

Anxiety can present very differently in each person and chronic disease states can also trigger anxiety. Anxiety can also exacerbate a chronic health condition too. It can be a vicious cycle that keeps going around and around.

Everyone’s cause of anxiety is different and it’s often a combination of factors that leads someone to feel the way they do. Many do not even realise they are suffering anxiety as mentioned before.

It’s important to remember that you can’t always identify the cause of anxiety, or change difficult circumstances. You cannot always be in control of every situation either.

Recognise the signs and seek professional help

The most important thing is to recognise the signs and symptoms and seek advice and support.

There are people that specialise in managing chronic pain. Good pain management programs should use a multi-modality treatment and management approach consisting of the most effective treatments for anxiety, such as counselling and psychology, medications, diet and lifestyle changes, exercise and other therapies that can assist with pain and anxiety.

With the right help and seeing the right people, it is possible to get ones life back despite having chronic pain, and in the process overcome anxiety. The one thing I always explain to people it that you will not be able to do this on your own. You will need help from qualified professionals. No amount of Dr Google, or advice from friends and family is going to be able to help you get through this without the help of qualified professionals trained to help in this area of healthcare.

If you are experiencing long term pain and could also be suffering from chronic anxiety, please go and talk to your healthcare provider. Many people are unaware that they have anxiety and this is actually exacerbating their current pain. Your healthcare practitioner can also talk to you about effective pain management and also help you seeking help and getting coping skills for your anxiety as well.

Beyond Blue has a very simple Anxiety checker (click here) and I urge everyone to take the test, especially those with chronic long-term pain and health issues.

Please remember that there is help out there. Please do not suffer in silence thinking that there is no help, or no end in sight for your pain and your anxiety as well.

Take care

Regards

Dr Andrew Orr

-No Stone Left Unturned

-Women’s and Men’s Health Advocate

01 Dr Andrew Orr

 

 

Expectation versus reality with surgery and ongoing healthcare management

I have talked about expectation versus reality before but I wanted to go over this subject again. I think that many treatment plans and even surgical interventions and treatment outcomes are not explained very well.
This then leads to people not really knowing what realists health outcomes are and also what realists healing times are either.
In my latest video blog I talk about the expectation versus reality when it comes to surgery and recovery times. I also talks about being realist about time frames with treatment and results on ongoing healthcare.
I also talk about the realist time frames to help with certain conditions and also being real about healing times for pain.
Watch my latest video post to see what I am talking about and trying to explain
Regards
Dr Andrew Orr (DOAM, MRepMed, MWHM)
-No Stone Left Unturned
-Reproductive Medicines and Women’s Health Experts
-Women’s and Men’s Health Advocate

Understanding Why Hysterectomy Does Not Cure Endometriosis

Hey everyone. I’ve just recently put up a post about the facts about why hysterectomy does not cure endometriosis.

It seems this is a very contentious issue and many people are not understanding the facts, or how endometriosis presents in the body. I also think that some people just haven’t read the actual article, as I do explain all of the reasons why.

But, it does seem some people are still not getting the reasons why, or have been told the wrong things. As usual, I am here to give the facts and this is what I am here to do with this post.. Give the facts.

I am sorry for many of the journeys you have been on too and that some of you are not being listened too as well. That is why I am here. To raise awareness and give the facts and help women with endometriosis have a voice.

This is to also raise awareness about adenomyosis too. Many really do not realise that they have this disease state, or have it coinciding with endometriosis as well.

So, I have done up the video blog to explain things in more detail and hopefully it helps all of you understand things better. It is also so people can see a visual explanation and see why hysterectomy will not “Cure” endometriosis.

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Give us this day our daily…..Bloating

Many people do not realise that the cause of their daily bloating may in fact start with their daily consumption of bread.

I always used to comment that when I was in travelling through Asia and eating all the great fresh foods over there, that I was feeling really good. I never got that bloated feeling that most people often get each day.

On arriving back home, I would always suddenly start to get stomach cramps and bloating for no reason. I find this quite ironic as most people have a perception that you are going to get food poisoning etc if you go overseas. I have never ever been sick in all the years of travelling there. Actually it is always the opposite, I always feel better when I eat the foods there.

Having ruled out bugs and parasites etc, I was starting to go a bit crazy as to what was going on. Then one day I didn’t get the bloating anymore.

What did I do that day?

Was it a virus just getting out of my system, or was it a food that I missed that day?

Then it all dawned on me that I had not eaten bread that day. I’m not a big bread eater anyway, but the next day I tried out my theory and ate some bread. Bingo!

I had bloating and pains all day again. So much for supposedly being a healthy staple food. While travelling in Asia, I didn’t have bread or many refined foods at all and that is probably why I always feel better when I go there.

Many people suffer bloating caused by bread

Actually many people suffer from bloating each day, caused by bread, and some suffer it quite severely. Some to the point that they actually look pregnant with it. Many people’s bloating and weight issues are caused from over consumption of bread and other refined flour foods. Many people lose weight just by giving up bread alone. The sad fact is many people continue to eat bread even when they know it is causing them bloating and pain etc.

When you look at the average Australian diet, we live on the stuff. Toast in the morning, sandwiches at lunch and sometimes we have bread with our dinner too. In this day and age, there is no reason to eat as much bread as we do. There are so many more healthy food alternatives available to us today, but we all go for the gut filler and bloater every chance we get. It’s quick and it makes you feel full, temporarily anyway.

Bread is just a filler to help you fill full

Actually if you look at the history of bread, it was born through poverty. It was born out of necessity when there was no other foods around and it gave the perception of being full. The trouble is the first breads were semi good for you as they were very dense and full of whole grains. Not this refined rubbish, full of chemicals and additives, that make it last for weeks. These days, weevils won’t even live in it and some kids can even get hyper on it because it can be laced with that many preservatives.

Gluten, yeast and other additives

Besides all the additives in bread today, there are two main ingredients that make many people have digestive issues. One is gluten and the other is yeast. Yeast is a rising agent and it can surely make the stomach bubble and rise too. Then the refined grains containing gluten also causes inflammation in the system. The other disturbing thought about bread it that it is really just flour and water. Flour and water makes glue and that’s why it clogs so many people’s bowels up each day. The gluten can also cause loose bowels for some people too.

Many people also have a misconception about the different types of bread too. Many people choose brown bread over white thinking it is a healthier option. Wrong!

Brown bread is just white bread with a tiny bit of wheat germ added and a splash of colouring to make it brown. Even when you do find a semi decent option, with the many breads out there, it still really isn’t a really healthy option. Again it is just a filler and there are many more foods out there with much more nutrition, and again it won’t make you bloated. We also now know how bad refined grains are for you.

Gluten free does not mean healthier

Don’t think for a moment that Gluten free is a healthier option, because it isn’t. It is still refined grains, minus the gluten. It is still inflammatory due to lectins and leptins and other things in the grains. Many gluten free products also contain a lot more sugars and emulsifiers too. It is best to go grain free than go gluten free.

Eating other foods instead of bread

I must admit that there is nothing quite like the smell of freshly baked bread, but that doesn’t make it good for you. The other hard thing about it is it is really hard not to give it to our kids, especially if they are going to school.

But I also know that with cooler packs now, there are many other options that we can give our children to take to school. Moderation is the key here. Have a look at some of the health snack options you can use instead of bread and refined flour products.

All of us need to cut back on the stomach glue (bread) and start eating some healthier foods such as salads, lean proteins, nuts, seeds, veggies and fruit. It isn’t all that hard.

Instead of eating that meat and salad sandwich tomorrow, how about just having the meat & salad. It is a much healthier option and it won’t bloat you either. Some nice sliced ham off the bone, or tuna, or chicken, and a lovely Greek salad and hey presto, we have a great healthy lunch option.

Other foods that may cause bloating

There are other may other things in our diet that cause bloating such as alcohol, oats, sugars, chocolate, fermented bean paste (miso) etc that people also need to be aware of. Overindulgence in all of these things can all lead the stomach to overload and cause bloating and pain.

One more thing, “no”, you just can’t take medicines and supplements to make the bloating go away and still eat the foods that cause bloating.  It doesn’t work that way. You have to remove the cause, otherwise the problem will continue no matter what you do.

So next time you look like you have added two clothe sizes,  with a stomach full of wind, remember that it may just be from the bread that you have just eaten beforehand. If you are getting bloating each day, it is a good idea to talk to your healthcare provider about this and look into the cause of your issues. There are simple testings for food allergens and your healthcare provider is trained to know what to test for and look for in your diet as well. There may also be an underlying disease state being missed as well.

Take care

Regards

Dr Andrew Orr

-No Stone Left Unturned

-Women’s and Men’s Health Advocate

Non medical Pain care

Non-Medical Ways to Manage Pain

In my recent post Getting a Handle on Pain with Proper Pain Management, I talked about the need for getting help with pain and how important it is to manage pain properly. But most of that was focussing on the medical side of things. But we also know that even with the best medical care, people are still in pain. So what is the answer is this approach is not working?

This is where we need to look at the Non-Medical ways to manage pain and look at an individualised and multimodality care approach to give people the best care and clinical management of pain possible.

Let’s have a look at what some of the Non-Medical options are first.

Acupuncture and Traditional Chinese Medicine

One modality that may assist in managing long-term pain is Acupuncture and Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). This medicine has been around much longer than modern medicine and it is very effective. There is now research to show that Acupuncture and TCM is not only assist with treatments for  pain and pain management, but it may be equivalent to the effects of some of our strong pain medications, when it is administered properly by a trained healthcare provider and with a series of treatments. It is also being used in mainstream hospitals for pain management too. While acupuncture may be effective for pain, there is no such thing as a one off treatment for any medicine and we all need to remember that.

Biomesotherapy (Biopuncture)

There is also an amazing therapy called Biomesotherapy, also known as biopuncture. It combines the use of acupuncture and also uses injectable saline and anti-inflammatories into the acupuncture points. Local anaesthetics and pharmaceutical injectable pain killers can also be injected into the acupuncture points and this is how it has been used in parts of Europe for over 50 years by main stream medicine. It may be affective for acute pain.

Chinese Herbal Medicines

There are also Chinese herbal formulas that may assist with pain and pain management and they may also help with the root cause of your pain as well. Again these aren’t a one off treatment and require a course of treatment to get the true benefits. You don’t just take one antibiotic, or one pain medicine and it fixes your issue and the same goes for herbal medicines. What we also need to remember is that up to 50% of our pharmaceuticals are actually derived from herbal compounds.

Chiropractic & Osteopathy

There are also some other great complementary therapies that may help pain. Chiropractic and Osteopathy may help with skeletal pain and may also help with realigning sublaxations that are impinging on nerves and may be causing pain. Both modalities may assist in helping balance the body as a whole.

Yoga & Pilates

Yoga and Pilates may help with pain by rebalancing the body, working on the core and also by assisting the body to relax. There is a bit more to it than that, but they can help. There is now some good research out there to support the use of these modalities.

Massage & Complementary Medicines

Massage may also help with pain and pain management.  There are also other herbal medicines that can help too. You need to see a qualified massage therapist and qualified complementary medicine practitioner to get the best care and advice with either of these modalities.

Your healthcare provider, or herbalist, can assist you by consulting with you and helping manage your condition. Just like medical interventions and pharmaceuticals, you should never self-prescribe and always consult with someone who is qualified in their particular profession. They can also administer you practitioner only medicines that are far stronger and more clinically efficient that over the counter products. It is the same in modern medicine too.

Physiotherapy

Physiotherapy can help with pain management and rehabilitation and women with pelvic pain may need a physiotherapist that can help with pelvic floor physiotherapy and that can do work internally. This is a specialist area though. Physiotherapy also fits into the medical model of pain management too.

Pulse Magnetic Therapy & TENS

Pulse magnetic therapy and TENS (Transcutaneous Electro Neuro Stimulator) may help with pain and ongoing pain management. While many people have heard of TENS, not many have heard of Pulse Magnetic Therapy and this is something that may assist with chronic pain and also pelvic floor instability and incontinence. There is such good research to support this as well. Many urodynamic specialists are now using pulse magnetic therapy in their clinics.

Diet

Let’s not forget the power of a healthy diet, when it comes to pain. Diets high in processed foods and sugars and refined grains, alcohol etc promote inflammation. Then inflammation causes pain and may make conditions causing pain worse. I always assess people’s diets, when they have pain, or health issues.

Exercise

Exercise may also assist with pain by helping with stress levels and helping with increasing blood flow into the muscles and brain and also helping with endorphins into the body. Again exercise can be a catch 22 situation. Some people are in so much people that they cannot even contemplate exercise. But, with starting out slowly and a step by step approach, little by little, exercise can help with controlling pain and getting the body back to optimum health again.

Counselling and Mindfulness

Lastly, talk therapy and counselling and mindfulness training is probably some of the most underrated therapies for the ongoing management of pain. I can’t say this enough. Our brain is what controls all our senses and unless we learn to control stress and quieting our mind, then managing pain is so much harder. I also know it can be a catch 22 situation too, but it is needed. While support groups and talking with friends is great, it cannot compare to the help from a trained professional, who has the appropriate years of training and is specialised in their particular field, or profession.

Important Things To Remember

Oh, and please don’t get your medical advice from people on support groups either. I see this so often and it really scares me what I see and hear.  I know they are well meaning and their support is great for you, but they are not a trained professional and this could be very dangerous. Let’s not forget that everyone has different needs according to their condition.

What medication, or therapy, one person is on, or taking, may make another ill, or actually make someone else worse. Please do not Dr Google either. A degree in Dr Google, doesn’t make one a healthcare expert and much of the medical advice on Dr Google is not right. Sure, be educated and be informed, but be careful too. Always consult with a healthcare professional for any health advice, or before trying to do something to manage your health.

Pain is something that we have all experienced, but it is not something that should be endured either. Of course there are individual cases that are just off the charts and require a whole different level of management. These people I feel sorry for the most. While some of these cases may never have their pain gone completely, with the right treatment most of them can be managed to some form of normalcy.

For the rest of the population, most pain can be treated if intervention is administered early enough and there is good ongoing management moving forward. The problem for many is that they aren’t being managed properly and many are trying to just do it themselves. That isn’t going to work. Some people just leave it too long too. The longer you leave pain not managed, the harder it is to treat.

You may also need that multimodality (team approach) for some conditions such as endometriosis and gynaecological conditions. Some other causes of pain will need this too. For others, they just need to see the right people and once they do, their pain can be treated, or managed really well. In many cases, it can be fixed completely.

There is no magic pill

Always remember that there is no such thing as a one off magic treatment for pain, or any health issues, and that there is no miracle one off magic pill to fix pain either.

Even though pain needs to be managed with medications sometimes, it isn’t always the answer either. People need look at treating the cause of their pain and also looking at other therapies outside of modern medicine too. This is where individualised treatments and treatment/management plans are the best, because everyone is different in what they are experiencing and what their particular issue is.

I have seen the amazing effects of a combination of therapies, or stand-alone therapies, in the treatment of pain and its ongoing management. If you aren’t getting the answers you need, with who you are seeing, or what you are currently doing, then you need to look outside the box, think outside the box and start finding treatments and healthcare people that can help you and your particular health issue.

Never underestimate the body’s power to heal itself with proper care and never underestimate the power of a second, or tenth opinion.

Getting proper help and care

If you aren’t getting the help you need, then book in a consult with me and I will do my best to get you the help and care you deserve and should be getting. I also have a great network of trusted professionals I work with if it is outside something that I do, or if you need that team approach for your condition. I have my trusted team and that is what you may need too.

One more things, for anyone, pain is the sign that something is wrong in the body and means it needs to be addressed. Oh and always remember, period pain is not normal either.

Take care

Regards

Dr Andrew Orr

-No Stone Left Unturned

-Women’s and Men’s Health Advocate

– The Headache, Migraine and Pain Experts

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The Man-Bashing of Male Healthcare Practitioners Who Help Women’s Health Issues. It Needs To Stop

All to often I hear some women “Man-Bash” male healthcare practitioners who specialise in Women’s Health issues. Often when male healthcare professionals are trying to bring awareness to female health issues it is now seen as the buzz word “Mansplaining”

What these individuals need to know is that there are many men at the forefront of women’s health issues and they are here to help women, not hinder them. These men do what they do because they care and they are passionate about what they do. Some do so because of partners, or family with gynaecological issues and they want to help any way they can.

These Male Specialists have had years of training and clinical experience and research behind them and actually know more about the female body than many females know about themselves. Being a female, or having a gynaecological disease does not make one an expert. The same goes for males with male health issues too.

Many of these male Women’s Health specialists are also some of our best advanced trained laparoscopic surgeons as well.  Many of these health experts also specialise in women’s diseases such as endometriosis.

We also have women specialists who are at the top of their field in male health issues. This should not be a gender thing and unfortunately some misinformed people tend to make it so. Too many people try to make it about self, rather than the bigger issue, or collective.

Many men give up their own time and are not paid for the work they do with women’s health issues. Some of  them are working at government level, media level and all sorts of areas to bring awareness to diseases that affect women.

Let’s not forget the men whose partners are affected by disease states. These men offer great support to women who suffer around the world and while they do not suffer the disease, they go through it all with their partners on differing levels.

In this video, I tackle two issue that really need to be talked about

  1. Period pain is not normal and no matter what anyone says, this is a fact
  2. We need to end the Man-Bashing of males who specialise in women’s health issues because many men are at the forefront and are trying to help women get the recognition they deserve.

Let’s end the silence for women who suffer disease states like endometriosis. Let’s end the myths around women’s health issues.

Period pain is not normal and women need to know about it.

Just like we need to end the silence about women’s health issues, we also need to end the Man-Bashing of male healthcare practitioners and educators out there at the forefront of women’s health.

Being a male does not mean we do not understand women’s disease states and it does not mean we do not understand pain. By taking away from these men’s messages and their dedication to women’s health, it is also causing damage to the bigger picture and is actually sabotaging women as well.

Have a listen to my latest video blog and explanation of this important subjects that we all need to talk about.

I myself am a male healthcare professional who helps with treatment, management and education of women’s health issues. I genuinely care about issues such as period pain, endometriosis, PCOS and fertility.  I have family with gynaecological issues and I have cared for thousands of women with gynaecological and fertility issues. It is a very special interest of mine and I want to see women get the care and help they need. Being male should not even be bought into this.

Lastly, if you are in pain and needs help, please give my clinic a call and make a time to book in a consultation.

Take care

Regards

Dr Andrew Orr

-Women’s and Men’s Healthcare advocate
-No Stone Left Unturned

-The Endometriosis Experts

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