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The Importance of Following Through With Advice, Treatments & Change

I see so many people who have been ‘missed’ and ‘dismissed’ and who have suffered in silence with their disease state.

But the biggest shame is when those that are offered real help, then do nothing with that advice and continue on the vicious, merry-go-round cycle of their disease.

My motto is “No Stone Left Unturned” and I apply that to every patient that I see. My initial consults are usually 1-2 hours in length and I also do lots of preliminary work prior to see a patient as well. I make sure all my patients are now only sent health appraisal questionnaires, but are also evaluated with mood and stress questionnaires for their mental health too. I really want to delve into every fine detail of a persons life to see what may be driving their disease state and symptoms. It is to also help with diagnosing those that have not been properly diagnosed either. I then write up a comprehensive report for all my patients, with everything they need to do, the changes they need to make, the medicines they need to take, the investigations and testing they need to have and all their step by step health management moving forward. No Stone Is Left Unturned as I mentioned before

As I mention in this video blog is that the greatest shame is those that come to get the advice and help and then do nothing with it. Just remember that if you do not change anything, or do the work needed, then nothing changes. The key to real change is actually within you.

If you so need help with a particular health issue, or you just aren’t getting the right answers and care, then please book in a time to see me and let me be your guide to better health and getting your life back to normal.

 

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Ultrasounds and blood tests have limited value for diagnosing some causes of period pain and menstrual irregularities

I know I have said this often, but it seems that every day I get another email saying that “I have period pain and I have been to the GP and done scans and bloods tests and he/she says that there is nothing wrong”

The problem is that there is something wrong and the first thing wrong is that someone was told that there is nothing wrong, when they have only had very basic testing done.

The second thing wrong is that most of these women are not being referred onto an appropriate specialist, which is what good sound ethical practice is. This is why some conditions like PCOS are taking up to 3 years to be properly diagnosed and conditions such as endometriosis are taking up to a decade to be properly diagnosed. It just should not happen.

I can’t begin to tell you how many women I have seen over my years in practice, that have been told that there is nothing wrong with them, or that the practitioner hasn’t found anything, when really all they have done is a basic scan and a few random blood tests. Then when these women are properly investigated we end up finding all manner of issues. Yet, these women were told that there is nothing wrong.

All I can keep telling people is that while ultrasounds can find some causes of gynaecological issues, there are many issues they cannot find. It also depends on the technician, or person scanning you too. I know that there are not that many specialised gynaecological radiologists and this is why many things do get missed. I have viewed scans that show abnormalities and the report says that everything is fine. This is why I will only ever read scans and not just reports.

Gynaecological issues such as endometriosis cannot be diagnosed by ultrasound and can only be diagnosed by surgical intervention, in the form of a laparoscopy and with histology. Then, as I have said many times too, it all depends on the surgeon you have seen. If your surgeon isn’t an advanced trained laparoscopic surgeon there is a very good chance you may not have been investigated properly. I have mentioned this in many of my previous posts.

Even some cysts, PCOS, polyps and other masses can be missed on scans and let’s not even talk about blood tests. Sure, some hormones levels can be a pointer to a certain issue, but they are not an accurate diagnostic. To be completely honest, many women with serious gynaecological issues will have normal hormonal levels and have completely normal blood results. This can even happen in certain cancers and why some of the cancer markers are now not being used as definitive diagnosis.

I can tell everyone that I have seen many gynaecological issues being missed, and women being dismissed over the years, and it still happens on a daily basis. If you have menstrual issues, or are in pain daily, or just with your menstrual cycle, and you are being told everything is fine, then you need to get a second opinion and a referral to a good  specialist.

Better still, come and book in a consultation with me and I will help you get you sorted and managed properly.

Regards

Dr Andrew Orr

-Women’s Health Expert

-No Stone Left Unturned

01 Dr Andrew Orr

 

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Von Willebrand Disease

Von Willebrand Disease (VWD) is the most common inherited bleeding disorder diagnosed in women with heavy abnormal uterine bleeding, due to a coagulation defect. Women with this disease may also have some tendency to bruising/nosebleeds in childhood but it will be when they get there first period that deficiency in von Willebrand factor – an essential protein required for both normal platelet function and as a co-factor to Factor VIII in the clotting cascade, most frequently presents.

A parent with VWD has a 50 per cent chance of passing the affected gene on to each child. VWD can affect both men and women. Sometimes genes mutate or change and can skip generations. Sometimes a child may have VWD but there was no family history of the condition. This means that VWD can occur in any family.

Women with this condition will present with excessive or prolonged bleeding with all other investigations normal (e.g. structural abnormalities are excluded). The diagnosis of Von Willebrand’s disease is by means of a coagulation screen and vWF antigen testing.

History behind Von Willebrand’s disease

Von Willebrand’s disease is named after Dr Erik Adolf von Willebrand, a Finnish paediatrician. In 1924, a 5-year-old girl was brought to the hospital in Helsinki where von Willebrand worked. He diagnosed her with a bleedingdisorder which he recognised was different from the haemophilia which was initially suspected. He subsequently assessed 66 members of her family and in 1926 first described the disease and its inheritance. Von Willebrand’s disease is the commonest coagulation defect in humans-but is also seen in dogs (notably Doberman Pinschers),and more rarely in swine, cattle, horses, and cats.

Symptoms of Von Willebrand’s Disease

Many people with the disease do not have any symptoms. Those who do may find that they:

  • have lots of nosebleeds
  • bruise easily
  • have heavy menstrual (period) flow
  • bleed excessively from the mouth.
  • The presence in your menstrual flow of blood clots greater than 1 inch (2.5 centimeters) in diameter
  • The need to change your menstrual pad or tampon more often than hourly
  • The need to use double sanitary protection to control menstrual flow
  • Symptoms of anemia, including tiredness, fatigue or shortness of breath

There are three main types of VWD:

  • Type 1
  • Type 2
  • Type 3.

These can be broken down into further categories. The most common are types 2A and 2B.

Complications of von Willebrand disease may include:

  • Anaemia– Women who experience heavy menstrual bleeding are more at risk of iron deficiency anaemia.
  • Swelling and pain-If abnormal bleeding occurs in the joints or soft tissue, swelling and severe pain can result.
  • Death from bleeding –Rarely, someone with Von Willebrand’s Disease may experience uncontrolled bleeding that can be life-threatening and needs emergency medical attention.

There are hormones and other medications that can help with the acute bleeding that can present with VWD.

Although Von Willebrand’s Disease is the most common pathology, other bleeding disorders including thrombocytopaenia and haemophilias should be considered. Consultation with a haematologist should be considered when a coagulation defect is diagnosed, or when the history suggests a clotting disorder. The main aim is to to manage the underlying disease but to also help with effective menstrual regulation (usually with combined contraceptive pills).

Regards

Dr Andrew Orr

Women’s and Men’s Health Advocate

-No Stone Left Unturned

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