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Genetics & Gene Sequencing May Be The Path To a Cure for Endometriosis

I have always said that the biggest inroads to the management and treatment of endometriosis will come from the area of genetics. I’ve also said that if there is going to be a cure, this will be the pathway that is comes from.

New research published in the New England Journal of Medicine has revealed that Gene sequencing has found a set of genetic mutations which may help to develop molecular tests to distinguish between mild and aggressive types of endometriosis. This is a big step forward into finding out more about endometriosis and developing better medical treatments and management strategies. Hopefully one day it will also lead to a cure for women with this horrible disease.

Endometriosis is a painful disorder in women which uterine tissue grows outside of the womb, most commonly into the abdomen, and will affect at least 1 in 10 women. It can spread to every part of the body.

Many women with endometriosis will experience symptoms of abdominal pain, migraines, pain with sex, ovulation pain, IBS like symptoms, UTI like symptoms (without infection present), menstrual cramps, abdominal distension and possible issues with infertility.

Endometriosis can affect both physical and mental health in sufferers. While a portion of women with endometriosis get pain and associated symptoms, it needs to be noted that a significant portion of women with endometriosis are asymptomatic (no symptoms) and would not even know that had it, until they are investigated for fertility purposes.

This discovery helps moves towards developing genetic based systems for classifying endometriosis to sort out which forms of the disorder needs more aggressive treatment. Presence of the unusual set of mutations suggest that while origins are rooted in normal endometrial cells mutations change their fate, the mutations identified have links to genetic mutations found in some forms of cancer. Abnormal endometriosis tissue growth will often spread throughout the abdominal cavity but rarely becomes cancerous with exception to a few cases when the ovaries are involved.

The close links to cancer have always baffled scientists, as endometriosis does behave like a cancer the way it spreads, and now they have found some of the same mutations found in cancers, in some of the endometriosis lesions. But again, endometriosis rarely turns cancerous, except if it does spread to the ovaries, but there have been some studies to suggest links that women with endometriosis may be at more risk of endometrial cancer.

In this latest research, the research scientists analysed the samples looking for mutations or abnormal changes in DNA and filtered out normal variations in genes which commonly occur. At least one or more mutations in endometriosis tissue that were not present in their normal tissue, in which the number and type of mutations varied per endometriosis lesion and each woman.The types of mutations found were among the most common mutated genes found, which are all known for DNA repair, controlling cell growth, and cell invasion.

The researchers are working on additional studies to investigate whether patient outcomes correlate with the mutations. Testing which can sort lesions into less or more aggressive has potential to help decide how to monitor progression as well as control and treat the endometriosis. It may also be possible to develop new treatments which use agents that block gene related pathways specific to an individual’s disease.

Women are normally prescribed anti-hormonal treatments, which block estrogen to shrink lesions. Endometriosis is estrogen driven and is not from estrogen dominance, as some people would have women believe. Even small amounts of estrogen can drive the disease and cause the expression of the lesions. When endometriosis occurs on the ovaries and forms a large cyst, or endometrioma, it is typically removed as it increases the risk of developing ovarian cancer in some women.

While this new development is not a cure for endometriosis, it is providing new insights into the disease, which will hopefully one day see a cure in the not so distant future. Lets help end the silence for women with this horrible disease by getting more awareness out there and let us hope that the cure will eventually come one day soon.

Regards
Dr Andrew Orr
-No Stone Left Unturned
-Period Pain IS NOT Normal
Dr Andrew Orr Logo Retina 20 07 2016

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Women with PCOS May Be at More Risk of Uterine Cancer

April 3, 2018 Researchers in the United Arab Emirates (UEA) have found that women who have Polycystic Ovaries Syndrome have an increased risk of uterine cancer, reducing their chances of fertility.

The researchers have also found that women, who are overweight, or obese, are also at increased risk of uterine cancer. Being overweight and obese also increases a woman’s chances of PCOS too, but not all women with PCOS are overweight.

A study published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute last year has shown that  endometrial cancer diagnoses have increased in 26 of 43 countries, mainly due to increasing obesity cases which themselves have tripled in the last 40 years, according to World Health Organisation.

The experts believe that obese women are 10 times more likely to suffer from uterine cancer. Being overweight, or obese also puts women at risk of other diseases such as heart disease and diabetes.

There are other factors involves such as an imbalance in the hormones with over-exposure to estrogens can lead to endometrial cancer. This could be due to endogenous causes such as Polycystic Ovaries Syndrome, or exogenous causes such as unopposed estrogens in menopausal hormone therapy if progesterone is not prescribed.

Some women may have genetic family syndromes that is predispose to uterine cancer along with breast, ovarian and other cancers. The causes of uterine cancer may be multifactorial, but this new research does help with screening of women who are suffering from PCOS, or who maybe overweight, or obese.

The researchers did find that regular exercise and healthy lifestyle choices can serve as a protection against uterine cancer, but can also help with PCOS and obesity.

The researchers did warn that women in reproductive years should not take symptoms of endometrial cancer lightly, since early diagnosis and treatment is an essential key to fertility preservation.

Once a condition that only affected women of advanced years, increasing clinical evidence now suggests that even women below 40 years of age can be diagnosed with uterine cancer.

The cancer cases are on the rise due to higher incidence of known co-morbidities such as obesity, diabetes mellitus and hypertension.

Symptoms of the endometrial cancer include:

  • vaginal bleeding between periods
  • bleeding after menopause
  • an abnormal, watery or blood-tinged discharge from vagina
  • constant back and pelvic pain
  • unintended weight loss
  • fatigue and nausea

Early screening is essential and women can safely consider fertility preservation provided that the cancer is diagnosed in early stages.

Fact around uterine cancer

  • Early diagnosis of uterine cancer can save women from fertility loss
  • World over, an increasing number of women in reproductive years falling prey to the disease
  • Obese women are 10 times more likely to suffer from endometrial/uterine cancer, other causes include hypertension and diabetes
  • PCOS may now be a risk factor for uterine cancer

Women who have PCOS, or who are overweight, should be seeking help with dietary and lifestyle management to help prevent them from other risk factors such as certain cancers. The number one treatment for PCOS is changing to a low GI diet and doing regular exercise. One of the major causes of PCOS is insulin resistance and this is a big factor in many who are overweight, or obese, or have type 2 diabetes. All of these issues can be controlled with the right management.

Regards

Dr Andrew Orr

-No Stone Left Unturned

Dr Andrew Orr Logo Normal 20 07 2016

 

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Women with Endometriosis More Likely to Suffer Migraines

Besides endo belly, pelvic pain, period pain etc, one of the other symptoms I see women with endometriosis experience is migraines. While not all migraines are just related to endometriosis and can be from a variety of factors, having endometriosis could give you more of a chance of having migraines.

Recent research published in the Journal of Fertility and Sterility has shown that Adolescents with endometriosis are more likely to experience migraines than adolescents without endometriosis. While the focus was on adolescents, it would be safe to say that any woman with endometriosis may be more likely to suffer migraines as well.

In the research, it was shown that adolescents with endometriosis were more likely to experience migraines (69.3%) than those without endometriosis (30.7%)

Among those with endometriosis, age of when the period started was associated inversely with the odds of migraines. The research also found that women with endometriosis and migraines have more dysmenorrhea than those without migraines.

The research showed a linear relationship exists between migraine pain severity and the odds of endometriosis, suggesting heightened pain sensitivity for adolescents with endometriosis. Due to the strong correlation, patients who present with either condition should be screened for comorbidity to maximize the benefits of care.

While the research showed a relationship between endometriosis and migraines it is also important to rule out other factors that cause migraines too, if you have endometriosis. For sufferers of the disease, it is important not to just blame every migraine on endometriosis. Diet, additives, stress, tight muscles, sublaxations, nerve impingement, sinusitis and many other factors need to be ruled out as well, so that the actual cause of a migraine is not missed.

For sufferers of Migraines please make sure you read my article on how to banish migraines too.

https://drandreworr.com.au/banishing-headaches-and-migraines/

Regards

Dr Andrew Orr

-No Stone Left Unturned

Dr Andrew Orr Logo Retina 20 07 2016

Womens Health Consultations

Women’s Health Consultations with Dr Andrew Orr

Are you sick of Painful Periods?

Are you tired of the flares from Endometriosis?

Are you getting pain with sex?

Is your period irregular and messing with your life?

Are you getting bad acne?

Are you getting increased bladder frequency?

Are you getting some incontinence with exercise?

Are you sick of having to put up with mood swings and hormone imbalance?

Sick of being “Missed” and “Dismissed” by healthcare professionals and friends telling you that your symptoms are normal?

Are you just not getting the answers to your health and gynaecological issues?

Do you just want to get your quality of life back and be able to do everything you want to do in life?

Getting Help

Many of the health and reproductive issues women face are not normal, but more importantly many of issues can be managed and assisted with right treatments and management protocols. The problem for most women, is knowing who to see, and where to start, for Women’s Health Consultations on the journey to a better life and better health.

Let Dr Andrew Orr Guide You Through Your Health Journey

Dr Andrew Orr’s multi-modality treatment approach (using medical science and complementary medicines) has assisted and helped over 12,500 plus babies into the world and helped and assisted tens of thousands of women with gynaecological conditions such as Endometriosis, Adenomyosis, PCOS, Fibroids, Bladder & Bowel Issues, Pelvic floor instability and so much more.

Dr Orr has a special interest in conditions such as period pain, endometriosis, PCOS and menstrual irregularities. You can find out more on some of his social media articles.

If you need someone who cares, someone who listens and can be your caring guide every step of the way through the challenges you are facing, then you need to book in a consultation with Dr Andrew Orr.

Dr Andrew Orr’s mottos are the “Period Pain IS NOT Normal” and he has a “No Stone Left Unturned” approach to every person he guides, manages and assists through their journey to a better quality life and better health.

Dr Andrew Orr has seen women from all over Australia and all over the world and can see you for a consultation in person, or through online services. Through easy to use online services, Dr Orr can now see anyone from all over Australia, or anywhere in the world. *(conditions may apply)

If you are suffering from a particular women’s health condition, or unknown health issue, Dr Andrew Orr is here to care for you and guide you through his step by step multimodality health management protocols and get you the help and care that you are so desperately needing.

* To find more please call Dr Andrew Orr’s clinic, or submit an online enquiry through the website.

 

 

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The Silent Face of Endometriosis

She closes the door and enters the day, with the face that she wants the world to see. She is beautiful, she is vibrant, she is smiling, and she is ready to face what ever the day may bring.

She is immaculately dressed, her hair brushed so neatly and even though she doesn’t need it, she has her make up on, her lipstick applied so neatly and she is every bit the goddess that the world will see today and every other day as well. All this makes her feel good and helps her to go about her day. She is a daughter too some, a sister to others and a partner to her beloved. She is grace and elegance and she is every bit a woman and she it about to embrace her day.

But, while she is every bit the goddess, and a warrior, and her beauty knows no bounds, underneath her catwalk like composure, is another story that the world around her may never really know, or ever come to understand. It is something that they just cannot even see.

Today is like any other day for her, but today is the day that her hidden disease has decided to raise its ugly head. Unlike the beauty that we see before us, this inner demon has taken hold of her and nobody will know the torment that goes on beneath her skin and deep into every organ in her precious body. Today would buckle many and have many lose their way, but not her, she is a warrior and she will not give in.

While the constant anxiety and pain and mixed emotions scatters every cell in her brain, she remains composed and ever focussed and this is all that she will let the outer world see. Very few will know that today is not a good day, but even then those that know, will know that this will not stop her from going about her day.

There are days though, that none shall see her and these are the days that no matter how hard she tries to embrace the day, the disease within has its tight grasp around her and she just need to hide away and deal with the pain. On these days it is just all too much to bear and though she will not give in, todays battle is best not fought, and she just wisely knows today is the day to rest, heal and repair. She knows that sometimes to win a battle, it is best to not fight at all.

Today the flare of the disease within has sent aches to her muscles, sensitivity to her skin, aches to her head, cloudiness to her brain, deep pain to her bones and spine and pulsating pain to her womb. Her belly is swollen, like she is about to give birth and the intestines feel like that are being twisted and ripped apart. She feels nauseas, her head pounds like the worst every hangover and she feels like she is about to pass out. Even the most important bodily functions are just too hard and just too sore today. The disease tries to contort her, to stop her, but she remains upright and continues her day. She does not let the disease win and she will never buy into the label and let it confine her.

Some days are even more stressful, because her monthly cycle has appeared and has come with full vengeance and feels like flood waters through the place that a woman gives birth. On those days, she may even feel like she has given birth and what is bought forth, only few will ever hear about. Not even her partner may see what these flood waters bring and what she just felt like she birthed. That is secret women’s business and only talked about in private, or to the healthcare provider that may assist her from time to time.

She is loving, she is vulnerable, she is caring, she is giving, she is strong, she is fierce when needed and she is every bit the woman that the world knows a woman to be. Even at times of intimacy, she will still give her all and love with such passion and tenderness, but all the while her partner will never know that the pain that may be within. Some days are good, some days are bad, but that doesn’t stop her expressing her passion, her love and her womanly desires and love for her partner. Her heart is pure love and a good man will know how to love her and support her and care for her on the days where she needs gentle, loving, tender care.

Today may not be a good day, but she will brave the day just like any other and hide the disease crippling her within. She will not cry out in the open, she will not even make a fuss. Not many will know today is a bad day, because her courage and strength will get her through the day, just as it has every other day. You will only see what she wants you to see and that is a smiling, strong, vibrant woman about to go and conquer her day.

This is what I see through my eyes, of the strong, vibrant goddess that we all shall see. Because I know the war she is fighting, I see what many do not see. I see what she goes through and why she sometimes has to hide away. I see her wipe away the tears she sheds in silence. I see how restless she is when she tries to sleep. I see the mixed day of pain and emotions and how she tries to regain composure to overcome her day.

Through my eyes I don’t see weakness and someone who is fragile, or someone who gives in. I see a goddess, a mighty warrior, someone who can overcome and conquer all before her. Not by brute force, but by love, by compassion, by listening, by understanding and by knowing how to do what is needed and when it is needed. That is true strength, she is a true warrior and she shows what is it is to be a strong capable super woman. She will not let her kryptonite conquer her and she will overcome it and conquer it instead.

Through my eyes I will never really be able to know, or understand what she really goes through. I can never know what she endures each day. I can only but imagine what it is like to be in her shoes and walk the path that she walks most days. But I know that on days that she isn’t feeling her best, she will let the world see the best that she can be. She won’t fuss, she won’t cry, she won’t show any pain. She is a true warrior and she just puts on her makeup, puts on her lipstick, brushes her hair nicely, dresses eloquently and gets on with her day. Those are the days that we can support her and love her and help her get through her day.

This is the face of endometriosis and only those that suffer from this horrible disease will know what it is like to live in silence while the rest of the world is completely unaware.

Let’s end the silence for the strong warrior endo sisters and the next time someone tells you that they have endometriosis, remember that just because they look fine, they look vibrant, they look strong, they look like a beautiful goddess etc……

Just remember that they may be fighting the fight within and today may not be a good day.

This is for my loved ones with the disease and every one of the “endo sisters”

March is Endometriosis Awareness month, so please take the time to acknowledge those with the disease and let’s help end the silence and please remember my most important motto…. “Period Pain IS NOT Normal”

Take care

Regards

Dr Andrew Orr

-Endometriosis Crusader

-No Stone Left Unturned

-Period Pain IS NOT Normal

 

Endometriosis Awareness Month-March 2018

The month of March is Endometriosis awareness month and I wanted to bring awareness about this disease where many women are missed and dismissed by multiple healthcare practitioners in the process.

Endometriosis is an inflammatory disease, by which endometrial like tissue grows outside the endometrium and affects 1 in 10 women. But while the current research says that 1 in 10 women are affected by endometriosis, as someone who specialises in endometriosis management, I believe that these figures may be grossly under exaggerated.

So many women suffer this horrible disease and many more do not even realise they have it. A significant portion of women with endometriosis are asymptomatic (meaning no symptoms). Women with this disease may take up to 10 years, or more, to be diagnosed after seeing multiple healthcare practitioners and specialists on the way. This amount of time to diagnosis is disgusting and just highlights how many women are missed and dismissed along the way. Many women are misdiagnosed as having Irritable Bowel Syndrome and other inflammatory disease states, when in fact the actually have endometriosis. I know that if this disease affected some of these so called healthcare practitioners, or if men had to endure this kind of pain, or their testicles were paining them all day, something would have been done about this disease long ago.

Meanwhile women with period pain caused by endometriosis have to live a life of pain, trauma and physical and emotional torment. Many of these women are barely getting through a day, let alone a whole month of exhausting symptoms related to this disease. Some are even at the point of suicide.

Endometriosis is mostly found outside the endometrium and can spread to the pelvis, bowel, bladder and intestines. It has even been known to get into the brain, joints, chest cavity, and around the heart. It has been found in nearly every part of the body.

According to the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologist Guidelines for the Management of Endometriosis, it can cause the following symptoms:

  • Heavy Menstrual Bleeding
  • Irregular bleeding
  • Period Pain
  • Pain with sex
  • Ovulation Pain
  • Irritable bowel like symptoms
  • Bladder issues (UTI like symptoms etc)
  • Chronic fatigue
  • Swollen painful pregnant looking belly (known as endo belly)
  • Pain with bowel movement

I am a healthcare practitioner with over 20 years experience in the diagnosis, treatment, assisting and managing endometriosis. I have helped women all over the world with this horrible disease. I know all too well the trials and tribulations women have to go through before someone actually listens and gives these poor women a proper diagnosis and get them the help they so desperately need.

“Period pain IS NOT normal” and all too often women are told that period pain and other associated symptoms is normal and nothing could be further from the truth. We need to educate women and young girls that period pain is not normal.

I would like to see better education and awareness for the general public, but I would also like better education and awareness for all healthcare professionals. I want all healthcare professionals to know what the signs and symptoms of endometriosis are so that women can be referred for appropriate treatment and management. Early intervention and treatment is the key to treating this disease and managing it properly

No woman should ever be missed, or dismissed with this horrible disease every again. Let’s end the silence on endometriosis and bring awareness to every woman and healthcare practitioner on this planet that period pain IS NOT normal.

Regards

Dr Andrew Orr

-No Stone Left Unturned

-Period Pain IS NOT Normal

Dr Andrew Orr Logo Normal 20 07 2016

 

What Are The Signs & Symptoms of Iodine Deficiency?

Why does the body need Iodine?

Iodine is a water soluble mineral that is needed in our diet to ensure that the thyroid works properly.The thyroid gland uses iodine to make thyroid hormones.

Thyroid hormones play an important role in a wide range of bodily functions, including metabolism, bone growth, immune response, and development of brain and the central nervous system (CNS).

Iodine helps convert thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) to triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4). This conversion is important for the thyroid to function properly.

Iodine is essential for brain development, bone health, healing, immune response, energy, metabolism and the development of the central nervous system. We also now know that we need iodine to help with pregnancy and fertility. Iodine deficiency during pregnancy and early childhood can also lead to developmental problems.

An iodine imbalance can lead to an overactive, or under-active thyroid.

Being deficient in iodine limits the ability of the thyroid gland to make hormones, causing hypothyroidism. Hypothyroidism happens when a person’s thyroid does not produce enough thyroid hormones. Hypothyroidism can cause symptoms of fatigue, depression, forgetfulness, hair weakness, hair loss, dry skin, weight gain, cold intolerance and constipation.

Signs of iodine deficiency

According to new research published last year, it was estimated that about a third of people are deficient in iodine. Here are some of the common signs that could suggest that a person may have an iodine deficiency.

1.Weight gain

One of the most noticeable signs of an iodine deficiency is unexpected weight gain.

When a person has a healthy metabolism, they burn calories to give them their energy. Hypothyroidism, or a lack of thyroid hormones, can slow down a person’s metabolism and this can then lead to weight gain. It is important to remember that weight gain is not always a sign of an iodine deficiency. It may only be a symptom when weight gain cannot otherwise be explained. Eating foods that are highly refined and high in sugars are probably the most common form of increase weight.

2.Feeling weak & lethargic

When a person has an iodine deficiency, they may feel weak and lethargic. Hypothyroidism can slow down a person’s metabolic rate and then they burn fewer calories for energy. When they have less energy, the muscles do not work as efficiently and then the person would feel weak. But, feeling weak may also be from other factors such as lack of sleep, lack of essential nutrients, lack of food intake and nutrient deficiencies. This may also be a sign of other health issues and needs to be investigated if it goes on too long.

3.Feeling tired

Unexplained tiredness may be a symptom of iodine deficiency. When a person is iodine deficient their metabolic rate may drop and this could cause them to feel tired. But, feeling tired does not always mean a person is iodine deficient. As mentioned before, if a person is not getting enough rest, it is natural for them to feel tired. Feeling tried could also be a sign of iron deficiency, or other health issues, but, if tiredness is unexplained, it may be a symptom of an iodine deficiency.

4.Hair Loss

Hair loss is another possible sign that a person might have an iodine deficiency.

Thyroid hormones support the renewal of hair follicles and when someone has hypothyroidism, a shortage of thyroid hormones means the hair follicles stop being renewed. It is natural for hair to fall out, but it is normally renewed. But, while hair loss can be a sign of iodine deficiency, it can also be caused by other hormonal issues as well as stress. Stress is one of the most common causes of hair loss.

5.Drying skin

Having dry, flaky skin could be a sign of hypothyroidism, and can be the result of iodine deficiency. Thyroid hormones help with the renewal of new skin cells. A lack of these hormones and a deficiency of iodine, may cause dead skin cells to build up, sometimes resulting in dry, flaky skin. While dry skin can be caused by iodine deficiency, it can also be caused from other factors such as lack of hydration, lack of essential oils and other health conditions

6.Feeling cold

Iodine deficiency causes a lack of thyroid hormones, which can then affect a person’s metabolic rate to slow down. As their metabolism slows down, a person produces less energy to give the body warmth. A lack of energy and lack of body heat will mean a person is more likely to feel the cold. But, feeling cold isn’t always a sign of iodine deficiency and can be a sign of lack of circulation and other health issues.

7.Having a slow heart rate

Having an iodine deficiency may make a person’s heart beat more slowly.

When a person’s heart rate slows down, they may feel a bit dizzy, nauseas, or sick. It may also make them feel a bit faint. But feeling this way may also be a sign of other health issues, or it could also be a sign of a virus, or issue with someone’s cardiovascular system and needs to be checked out.

8.Learning or memory problems

Thyroid hormones are important for brain development and Iodine deficiency may cause a lack of these hormones, resulting in problems with memory and learning. Studies have shown that people, who are deficient in iodine and have lower level of thyroid hormone, may have parts of their brain being smaller and this then affects their memory. But while this may be the case, learning and memory problems could be caused from other health issues and need to be checked out properly

9.Pregnancy complications

Iodine deficiency may cause issues during pregnancy for the developing baby and it can be harder to get enough iodine during pregnancy. Not only does a women need iodine for herself, but she needs it for the growing baby inside of her as well.

Thyroid hormones are necessary for the healthy development of a baby before it is born. A lack of iodine and thyroid hormones may prevent the baby’s brain developing properly. It may also affect their immune system and affect their growth. If a pregnant woman’s body is too low in iodine it could cause her baby to be stillborn.

10.Heavy or irregular periods

Deficiency in iodine can lead to low thyroid hormone levels, which can then affect the levels of hormones that regulate a woman’s periods. Iodine deficiency can lead to periods that are heavier than usual, or the periods that are more or less often than usual. While, iodine deficient could cause abnormal abnormalities in a woman’s menstrual cycle, irregular or heavy periods are usually a sign of gynaecological conditions that needs to be evaluated by a specialist.

11.Swollen neck and goitres

If a person is deficient in iodine, the thyroid gland can become enlarged and this can then make the neck become swollen. This can lead to a condition called goitre. Abnormalities with the thyroid gland and hormones can also cause growths called nodules.

When the thyroid does not have enough iodine, it will try to absorb more from the blood and this then causes the thyroid to become enlarged, making the neck appear swollen.

Complications and diagnosis.

An iodine deficiency may happen when a person does not consume enough foods that are rich in iodine, or have adequate supplementation. This deficiency is more likely to affect pregnant women who need a higher intake of iodine.

Pregnant women and their babies experience the most serious complications of iodine deficiency. In the worst cases, it can lead to babies being stillborn or born with mental issues due to stunted brain development.

If you think you may be deficient in iodine you can go to your doctor and they can organise proper testing for you. The most effective way to diagnose iodine deficiency is via a urine test.

If you have a family history of thyroid issue, or are to conceive, or are pregnant, you should be supplementing with iodine based multivitamins or individual supplements. A person needs to consume 150 micrograms (mcg) of iodine each day to maintain a healthy level for their body. You should also be looking at eating iodine rich foods daily as well.

The following are good sources of iodine:

  • Seaweed
  • Cod, tuna, salmon and white fish
  • Plain Yogurt, Cheese and Milk
  • Iodized salt
  • Shell fish and oysters
  • Eggs
  • Dried prunes

Regard

Dr Andrew Orr

-No Stone Left Unturned

 

 

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Acne Can Be a Major Sign That You Have Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS)

Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most common reproductive/endocrine disorder — and most common cause of infertility — affecting 9 -18% of women around the world. One of the major signs that you may have PCOS is acne on the face, or other parts of your body. Many women will have this one symptom overlooked and then have a major reproductive/endocrine disorder overlooked as well.

Despite the prevalence of this chronic condition, one-third of women diagnosed with PCOS saw at least three health professionals over the course of two years before receiving a diagnosis, according to a study from the University of Pennsylvania.

Polycystic Ovaries (PCO) is a characterised by multiple cystic growths on the ovaries. In large it is an endocrine and hormonal disorder, but it has potential to cause gynaecological and reproductive issues and these issues can be varied. Women with PCOS may not have cystic formation and just have symptoms that are part of the syndrome only (eg-acne, irregular cycle).  PCO and PCOS really are two different conditions, but now they are both put under the one title of PCOS and this actually isn’t correct. Some women only have the cysts (PCO), while others have no cysts but have the syndrome (PCOS). Some have both. The one thing that they all have in common is that they all have insulin resistance. The other thing we know is that there is usually a family member with the same condition whom has passed the condition on genetically. Often the family member passing on the genetic traits, doesn’t even know that have the condition in the first place.

Recent studies have shown that there are “major gaps” in education and support for women with these conditions (PCO and PCOS). We see the same thing with other gynaecological conditions such as endometriosis and Adenomyosis and why these conditions can take up to a decade to be diagnosed properly

As a healthcare practitioner, I see these same issues with so many women waiting years to get a proper diagnosis and they have seen multiple healthcare professionals in both the medical and complementary medicine profession. It also creates confusion and anxiety for women who just want an answer to their condition and are not being diagnosed properly and also getting conflicting advice and treatment in the interim.

The signs and symptoms of PCOS are very clear and easily diagnosed, but many healthcare professionals end up focussing on one symptom, while overlooking the bigger picture and then these poor women get their condition missed.

Acne is one of the major signs of having PCOS and many women have his overlooked, or unaware that they may have a condition that could affect their fertility later on. If a women presents with Acne, irregular periods etc, I know there is a very good chance that she could have, or actually has PCOS. The problem for these women, as explained before is that healthcare providers and placing too much emphasis on only one of these symptoms, which is usually the Acne, or just that the cycle is irregular. Then women are then put on the Pill and these symptoms are masked for years, until they try and have a child and have difficulty doing so. The other issue is that the acne is often the focus, due to vanity reasons, and this is also why the many of the treatments for the acne are not working, because they are failing to treat the root cause of the issue. It just becomes one big vicious circle that goes round and round until someone finally diagnoses the actual cause properly.

Women with PCOS also have an increased risk of type 2 diabetes, gestational diabetes, metabolic syndrome and anxiety and depression, and studies have shown that the longer it takes for the condition to be diagnosed, the longer the patients condition begins to affect both their physical, emotional and reproductive health

The most common signs of PCOS are:

  • Absent, Irregular and Inconsistent menstrual periods,
  • Acne
  • Excess hair growth (some women can have hair loss too)
  • Central obesity

But many women with PCOS are of normal body weight and can actually be underweight too. It can affect women of any shape, weight or size. Some women with PCOS have regular menstrual cycles and can be fairly asymptomatic (meaning no symptoms) too

Just like endometriosis, women with PCOS are often missed and dismissed and the impact this has can be significant psychologically and also significant on their future fertility. There needs to be better health professional resources and international dissemination to improve diagnosis, education, management and reproductive and health outcomes.

I am always saying to healthcare professionals (medical and complementary medicine) that if you don’t know how to do your job properly, you don’t know how to diagnose conditions like PCOS or Endometriosis properly, or it is out of your scope of practice, get out of the way and refer these women onto people who are trained to diagnose and manage these conditions properly.

Lets, help put and end to PCOS and also put an end to Endometriosis and other inflammatory gynaecological conditions as well. Let’s break the silence and help women get the diagnosis and care they need. Early intervention and treatment is crucial for any disease state and let’s help women get this care sooner.

Take care

Regards

Dr Andrew Orr

-Women’s and Men’s Health Advocate

-“Period Pain IS NOT normal”

-“Leaving no Stone Left Unturned”

Dr Andrew Orr Logo Retina 20 07 2016

Knowing All Too Well What It Is Like To Live With Pain

I often get asked how I know so much about pain and living with disease state and pain on a day to day basis. While I am a man and cannot truly understand what it is like to have a gynaecological condition and the associated symptoms, I can understand how pain can affect ones daily life and how hard it is to manage a chronic disease state.

You see, I too have a chronic disease state that was missed and dismissed for many years. It causes me pain when the disease grows back and the inflammation gets bad. It has required me to have multiple surgeries, because it was missed for so long. Even though surgery helps, it isn’t a cure and the disease can grow back and then start causing pain and associated symptoms again. Sounds a lot like endometriosis doesn’t it?

While I don’t have endometriosis, I do have a disease that is very much like endometriosis and just this week I have had my 7th surgery for this disease.

My disease state grows in my sinus cavities and it can cause such excruciating pain in my head and make me feel really unwell. It’s really hard to use your brain to shut off pain, when the actual pain is in your head and it feels like my head is going to explode. If the disease gets out of control too much, it could cause extreme pressure and actually cave the bones around the sinuses inwards, so it can be dangerous.  I wish someone had listened to me and helped me earlier on so that I wouldn’t have to have been going through the surgery again.

But, I have learned to find the right team to help me. I have learned to manage pain levels using a multimodality treatment approach. I have learned that diet and lifestyle choices can help me manage my disease state. This is why when I talk to all of you, I understand what you all go through and why I am so passionate about telling you all the facts and helping you get the right help and intervention. They always say that to truly understand pain, you have to experience it yourself. Unfortunately I know all to well how pain can affect the whole body, not just where the pain is orginating from.

While I know first hand how bad pain can affect ones life, I have also learnt that the disease does not define me. I am not the disease and I have made a conscious decision to be proactive with my health and not live and breath the disease.

While it is good to be educated and proactive about your health, it isn’t good to live in your disease and let it overcome you and rule your life either. It is about getting up each day, making healthy choices, pushing yourself to move forward and remember that it is all about small steps forward, not matter what is going on.

I found the more I focussed on my disease, the worse things became and I got caught up in the pain cycle and the disease took over and it just made things too hard on both a physical and emotional level. Sure, there are days when you will have a bad day and that is ok. I know I had days where I had to take painkillers and just get on with it and nobody would ever have known how much pain I was in. Sure, there are going to be days when it doesn’t seem fair and that nobody can truly understand what it is like for you. The main thing is to not live in the ‘poor me’ syndrome and not let the disease define you. It is about overcoming the disease and being you again. It is about finding your team to help you. It is about finding that support you need and not buying into the diagnosis and living in the disease.

The more positive you are, the happier you are, the quicker you will heal and the treatments will work better too. Whatever you need to do, you just need to go and do it. If that means seeing a counsellor, seeing a pain specialist, seeing a gynaecologist, seeing a nutritionist, getting some acupuncture, seeing a physiotherapist, seeing a chiropractor/osteopath, taking pain killers, taking herbal medicines, or whomever and what you need that can help you, then you need to do it.

I also know all too well how hard it can be to get started, but when you get started and you keep going and you find the right team of people to help you, that is when you get the results. Never underestimate the power of positivity and never think that all is lost and get lost in your disease state and symptoms. Even if you make two steps forward and then one step back, you are still moving forward. Try and do something you love each day and try and find joy and positivity in your day. It is so important.

Lastly, never ever just take one opinion and always get multiple opinions about what you are experiencing. This is why I offer a multimodality approach for people and offer a multitude of services like a one stop shop. It is why my motto is “No Stone Left Unturned” because I dont want to see anyone be missed and dismissed. The reason I do a multimodality approach and use and integrative medicine approach, is so I can help people as much as possible on my own and then only have to refer for things like surgery and some other specialty areas that I do not do.

Please remember that pain, no matter where it presents in the body, is a sign of inflammation and a sign that something isn’t right. It is a sign that something needs to be investigated and managed and is you are being missed and dismissed constantly, then you need to find another healthcare practitioner, or a team of healthcare people that can help you moving forward and get some sort of normalcy back in your life. If you can’t find the right person, or team, then book in and see me instead. I’ll make sure “No Stone is Left Unturned” and I also understand what it is like to live with pain. You wont be missed and dismissed at my clinic. Don’t forget that I can do online consultations for people that live interstate, aren’t local, or live overseas. I can be your eyes and ears and be your guide and coordinator too. I understand pain.

Take care

Regards

Dr Andrew Orr

Women’s and Mens Health Advocate

-No Stone Left Unturned

-Period Pain IS NOT Normal

 

 

Early Intervention & Early Management Is Vital For Gynaecological Conditions & Menstrual Issues

By now many of you would know my stance on Period Pain not being normal and that the sooner you get the cause treated and managed the better one is going to be in their day to day life.

Unfortunately not everyone knows that Period Pain is not normal and neither are some of the other symptoms women get each month with the onset of their menstrual cycle. Having heavy bleeding, bleeding in between cycles, menstrual cramps, severe pain, irritable bowel like symptoms, dark clotting, ovulation pain, bowel and bladder pain and urgency etc, are all not normal symptoms that a woman should endure with her cycle. Getting these symptoms at any time of your cycle is not normal either.

Early intervention and early management is the key to any disease state in the body and this definitely applies to menstrual issues and gynaecological disorders. Once a disease is expressed into the body, it can be very hard to treat, especially if it is left a long time and then inflammation spreads to other parts of the body, or in close proximity to where the initial disease was first expressed.

One of the reasons that prompted me to do this post was after a young woman, now in her 30’s, had contacted me and thanked me for helping her back when she was in high school. Since then I have known all of her family well and helped with maintaining their health. At the time she was about 14 years old and showed all the signs and symptoms of endometriosis. She was in so much pain each month, when her cycle came, and she was often curled up on the floor with nausea and vomiting from the pain. Everyone, including GP’s etc, had told her this is normal and that she needed to get used to it. They also told her that she is too young to have endometriosis, or any major gynaecological condition.

That is so bad. Please, please know that period pain IS NOT normal and that teenagers are not too young to have endometriosis. To be honest, they are now finding endometriosis in young girls under 10 years old. Many gynaecological issues can start very early on in a woman’s life, especially if there are hereditary factors involved.  Gynaecological and menstrual issues can be passed from generation to generation, so if mum, or your grandmother, or someone in your family tree had menstrual issues, or a gynaecological condition, there is a good chance that you may inherit this as well.

The long and short of it all was that her mother was also getting frustrated at everyone not helping and somehow ended up finding out about me and ended up in my clinic. From there I got her into one of the advanced trained laparoscopic surgeons I work closely with as soon as possible and this is where stage 4 endometriosis was found and excised properly.  Without coming to see me, this poor girl would never have found the cause of her menstrual pain and associated symptoms. I then did all her management of her disease moving forward. The main thing that this young girl and her mother were worried about was how this was affecting her education and daily life, but how this could also affect her future fertility.

The one thing I know is that the sooner there is intervention and treatment, the better the prognosis for a woman’s future fertility is. The one thing I do know is that endometriosis doesn’t always cause infertility, but it can make it harder to fall pregnant, if it isn’t managed early enough. The longer you leave a disease in the body untreated, the worse it gets, and then the symptoms get worse and the worse the future outcomes may be.

Lucky for this young lady is that she did have early intervention and management and she has proudly messaged me to tell me that she has had her 3rd child and that she puts it all down to me helping her when she was younger. I have many women message me and tell me much the same thing. It is so important not to leave these things just because you are being told it is normal. What the hell is normal about being in so much pain that you feel like you could die?

All too often I see women having gynaecological conditions, like endometriosis, missed and dismissed and that the longer that the disease has been dismissed, the harder it is going to be to treat. That is a sad fact for many women and some will have to endure repeated surgeries due to being missed and dismissed and have a life of issues, if their issue isn’t managed properly either. Many have not seen the right healthcare professionals, or the right surgeon either.

I have discussed in many of my previous posts.  Please have a read of my previous posts about this subject and the seeing the right team of people. This is why it is so important to have early intervention and also see a proper advanced trained laparoscopic surgeon who specialises in the excision of disease states like endometriosis. Then there needs to be proper management and treatments and lifestyle changes administered to help with suppression of the disease state, helping with inflammation and improving quality of day to day life.

There needs to be a multimodality/team like approach to the management of women with gynaecological issues, as there is no one single fixes all approach, with any medicine. While surgery may be a necessary part of the overall management of disease states such as endometriosis, it isn’t the saviour that many perceive it to be. Surgery does not sure endometriosis and there is no cure for the disease at present time. Once you have it, it is there for good.

Surgery is a necessary but small part of the overall picture that needs to combine many other treatments and modalities to give the best outcome for a woman overall. Once the surgery is done you need to look at managing and suppressing the disease and this is done by lifestyle changes, dietary changes, acupuncture, physio, herbal medicines, hormone therapies, pilates, yoga, pelvic floor and core exercises and many other modalities depending on one’s individual symptoms.

When I treat women with gynaecological conditions, or menstrual issues, I make sure they all get an individualised, person centred, caring approach tailored to how they are presenting rather than a one treatment for all approach that many seem to get. You won’t get the results you need that way because we are all individuals with different needs and different symptoms overall.

Lastly, please remember that period pain and menstrual irregularities are not normal and that the earlier you get onto it and get it treated and managed, the better your future outcomes will be.

Regards

Dr Andrew Orr

-No Stone Left Unturned

-Period Pain IS NOT Normal